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Hitchcock Chronology: Alfred Hitchcock

Entries in the Hitchcock Chronology relating to Alfred Hitchcock...

1888

August

1892

1899

August

1908

July

  • The July 1908 London Telephone Directory lists the Hitchcock family as now residing at 175 Salmon Lane, Limehouse, and contactable on telephone number East 3332.[1]

1910

October

  • 5th - In the autumn of 1910, Alfred Hitchcock, aged 11, begins studying at St. Ignatius College, a Jesuit Catholic secondary school in Stamford Hill, London.

1911

  • Hitchcock continues his education at St. Ignatius College and receives a distinction in mathematics[2].

1913

July

  • 25th - Hitchcock graduates from St. Ignatius College.[3]

September

1914

November

  • Following his studies at the London County Council School of Marine Engineering and Navigation, Hitchcock begins working for W.T. Henley's Telegraph Works Company Ltd on Bromfield Street, London, where he is initially employed in the sales department.[6]

December

  • 12th - Alfred Hitchcock's father, William Hitchcock, dies from chronic emphysema and kidney disease.

1915

  • Although educated in engineering, Hitchcock soon realises that he doesn't want to become an engineer and so enrols on a evening course at Goldsmiths College to study art. The course leads to his appreciation of fine art and to a deeper interest in theatre and film.[7] During this period, Hitchcock increasingly seeks out new plays and films.

1916

1917

March

  • 1st - Hitchcock's nephew, Henry William Lee, is born to parents Ellen Kathleen and Harry Lee at 1 Hooper Street, Whitechapel, London.
  • 28th - Hitchcock's cousin Charles James Hitchcock dies from injuries sustained whilst fighting in Egypt. He had served as a Private in the 3rd County of London Yeomanry (aka the "Sharpshooters") and the Machine Gun Corps, and had also fought in Gallipoli and Palestine. He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery.[9]

1918

January

  • 1st - Hitchcock's brother-in-law Harry Lee, husband of Ellen Kathleen Hitchcock, enlists and joins the Navy. Within a few days he is transferred to the Royal Naval Air Service at Roehampton where he most likely works as a member of the ground crew.

September

  • 26th - Hitchcock's niece, Ellen Marcella Lee, is born to parents Ellen Kathleen and Harry Lee at 16 Parker Street, Cowley St. John, Oxford.

1919

June

  • Settled into his new role in the advertising department, Hitchcock becomes the editor of a new in-house magazine for W.T. Henley's Telegraph Works — The Henley Telegraph. The initial issue, dated 1st of June 1919, includes a contribution from Hitchcock entitled "Gas".[10]

September

  • The September 1919 issue of The Henley Telegraph contains a contribution from Hitchcock entitled "The Woman's Part".[11]

1920

January

February

  • The February 1920 issue of The Henley Telegraph contains a contribution from Hitchcock entitled "Sordid".[14]

March

  • 12th - Hitchcock's nephew, Clifford John Lee, is born to parents Ellen Kathleen and Harry Lee at 1 Rupert Street, Whitechapel, London.

April

  • 22nd - J.M. Barrie's melancholic play Mary Rose debuts at the Haymarket Theatre in London. According to some sources, Hitchcock saw the play on the first night.

September

December

1921

March

  • The March 1921 issue of The Henley Telegraph contains a final contribution from Hitchcock entitled "Fedora".[17]

April

  • 27th - Hitchcock begins working full-time for Famous Players-Lasky British Producers Limited at their Islington Studios.

1922

  • During summer of 1922, Famous Players-Lasky begins to wind up it's UK operation and lays off many of it's staff — including the 22 year old Alma Reville. The hard-working Alfred Hitchcock survives the job cuts and continues to work at the Islington Studios, which are leased out to other filmmakers.

1923

January

March

July

  • Filming begins on The White Shadow, Betty Compson's second film for Balcon, Freedman & Saville. Hitchcock wrote the scenario and is assistant director to Graham Cutts.[19]

1924

September

  • Filming of The Blackguard is completed in Berlin and the Gainsborough Pictures staff, including Alma and Alfred, return to London.[20]
  • Graham Cutts, Alfred Hitchcock and Alma Reville arrive Berlin to film The Blackguard, a joint production between Gainsborough Pictures and the Ufa Studios.[21]

1925

May

June

  • 6th - The production crew for The Pleasure Garden depart Munich for Genoa. En route, their film stock is confiscated by Customs Guards. Once in Genoa, Hitchcock desperately sources new film stock to replace the stock that was confiscated on the train.[23]

July

  • Hitchcock shoots the nightclub dance scenes of The Pleasure Garden in Munich.[24]

August

  • Hitchcock completes the filming of The Pleasure Garden.[25]

November

December

  • Gainsborough Pictures announce that, upon his return from Munich where he is filming The Mountain Eagle, Hitchcock will direct The Lodger.[27]
  • With filming completed on The Mountain Eagle, Hitchcock returns to London and begins post-production editing.[28]

1926

February

  • 24th - The Daily Mail reports that "an army of painters of carpenters" are busy working at Gainsborough Studios in preparation for filming to begin on The Lodger and that Hitchcock "is out daily with his camera man in search of coffee-stalls, bits of the Embankment, and street corners for the exterior scenes of this new London murder mystery".[29]
  • 25th - Hitchcock films the opening scenes for The Lodger on the Thames Embankment.[30]

April

  • 14th - The Observer newspaper carries a review of The Pleasure Garden saying that, whilst Hitchcock was "saddled with a complicated story", "he has made some of it, so interesting as to make one eager and optimistic for his future."[31]

May

  • 29th - The Western Morning News reports that Hitchcock, "the world's youngest producer", will "in spite of many tempting offers from California [...] dedicate his gifts to the revival of the British film industry, and when the great new studios are opened at Elstree — the English Hollywood — Mr. Hitchcock will become the principal creator of British national pictures".[32]

June

  • 8th - The Dundee Courier reports that Hitchcock is currently in Scotland scouting for suitable locations to film an adaptation of John Buchan's 1922 novel Huntingtower.[33]

September

  • 15th - The Lodger is screened for the press and trade at the Scala Theatre, Nottingham. The Nottingham Evening Post praises Hitchcock and says he "has little to learn from Hollywood".[34]

October

  • 20th - In an article published in the Aberdeen Journal, J. Aubrey Rees of the British Film League names Hitchcock as a high calibre director.[35]

December

  • 2nd - Alfred Hitchcock marries Alma Reville at Bromptom Oratory, South Kensington, London.[36][37] Alfred's older brother, William, is the best man and Alma's younger sister, Eva [born Eveline], is the maid of honour. The Reverend J.J. Bevan presides over the marriage service.[38][39]
  • The newly married Alma and Alfred Hitchcock spend their honeymoon at the Palace Hotel[40] in St. Moritz and at Lake Como in Italy, travelling via Paris where they spend a day with actress Nita Naldi.[41]

1927

January

  • Upon returning to the UK from their honeymoon in St. Moritz, Alma and Alfred Hitchcock move into their their new house, 153 Cromwell Road, Kensington, London, where they occupy the top two floors.[42]
  • Gainsborough Pictures announces that Alfred Hitchcock will direct Downhill.[43]

February

March

  • 30th - The Hitchcocks depart from London for Nice and the French Riviera to film location footage for Easy Virtue.[45][46]

June

  • Hitchcock leaves Gainsborough Pictures and signs a new contract with British International Pictures.[47]
  • 2nd - Speculation as to who will direct the screen adaptation of Eden Phillpotts' highly successful comic play The Farmer's Wife is ended when British International Pictures announces that Hitchcock will direct after completing The Ring.[48]
  • 7th - Hitchcock films the polo match in Easy Virtue at the Roehampton Club.[49][50]
  • 11th - Writing in The Guardian newspaper, film critic C. A. Lejeune calls Hitchcock "Britian's Baby" and argues that when he "sets to work on real film material, real artist's material, there will not be more than half a dozen producers in the world, who will be able to beat him. There are none in England now."[51]

July

October

  • 12th - The Times newspaper reviews Downhill and says that Hitchcock "tells the story clearly and with humour, and, in most cases, the characters are drawn with great skill."[53]
  • 14th - British International Pictures holds a press luncheon in London where chairman John Maxwell announces that actress Betty Balfour has signed a two-year contract to the company and her first role will be in Hitchcock's Champagne.[54]

November

  • Several British and Australian newspapers report on Hitchcock's new contact with British National Pictures (which soon becomes British International Pictures) on a salary that is set to rise to £17,000 a year. Presumably based information contained in a studio press handout, they claim Hitchcock entered the film industry as a teenager — in reality he began working for Famous Players-Lasky in 1921, aged 21.[55]

December

  • Mrs Lucy Baldwin, wife of the British Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, visits British International Pictures' Elstree Studios and watches Hitchcock at work filming The Farmer's Wife.[56]

1928

January

  • British International Pictures announces that Alfred Hitchcock will direct Champagne, starring Betty Balfour.[57]

February

  • Filming begins on Hitchcock's third film for British International Pictures, Champagne, which stars Betty Balfour.[58]

April

  • 9th - Hitchcock's sister Ellen Kathleen gives birth to a child out of wedlock, christened Albert William Ingram. The father is licensed victualler Albert Edward Ingram, who is married to another woman, and the child is raised by foster parents. Albert and Ellen fail to register the birth of the child until 1932.

June

  • Hitchcock completes Champagne.[59]

July

September

November

  • British International Pictures announces that Alfred Hitchcock's next production will be an adaptation of Charles Bennett's play Blackmail.[61]

1929

February

March

  • Newspapers begin reporting that Hitchcock will direct an original story by Benn Levy titled "Tambourine" after completing Juno and the Paycock.
  • British International Pictures announces that Alfred Hitchcock will direct an adaptation of Sean O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock.[63]

May

  • 13th - The Duke and Duchess of York visit the British International Pictures studios, where they meet with Alfred Hitchcock and watch a scene from Blackmail being rehearsed.[64]
  • 22nd - Location filming for the exterior shots of the Blackmail chase finalé at the British Museum takes place. According to newspaper reports, Hitchcock encouraged cinematographer Jack E. Cox to include members of the general public in the sequences.[65]

October

  • British International Pictures announces that Hitchcock will direct a screen adaptation of Sean O'Casey's Juno and the Paycock, followed by an adaptation of the Clemence Dane/Helen Simpson book Enter Sir John.[66]

December

1930

August

  • 6th - Hitchcock is one of 300 guests attending a luncheon ceremony to honour pilot Amy Johnson at the Savoy Hotel, London. The Hon. Esmond Harmsworth presents Miss Johnson with a cheque for £10,000. The other attendees from the world of British cinema are listed as Brian Aherne, Noel Coward, Annie Croft, Gwenn ffrangeon-Davis, Maurice Evans, Jean Forbes-Robertson, Nancy Heath, W.H. Heath, Lupino Lane, Charles Laughton, Frank Lawton, Auriol Lee, Alison Leggett, Ivor Novello, Mabel Poulton and Glen Byam Shaw.[68]

September

October

  • A British International Pictures press release of upcoming productions names Hitchcock as the director of The Man at Six.[70]

1931

January

  • 21st - The Times reports that Rich and Strange will be Hitchcock's next film for British International Pictures.[71]

April

  • 27th - Hitchcock's sister Ellen Kathleen marries licensed victualler Albert Edward Ingram in a Roman Catholic ceremony at the St Thomas of Canterbury, Fulham. Father W.A. Wright performs the ceremony and the witnesses are Emma Jane Hitchcock and Alma Reville. Ellen Kathleen had given birth to an illegitimate child in April 1928, the result of her affair with Albert Edward, who was married to another woman at the time.

November

  • 4th - The Times reports that Hitchcock will be directing a screen adaptation of Jefferson Farjeon's play Number Seventeen for British International Pictures.[72]
  • 16th - Actress Phyllis Konstam marries in London. The Hitchcocks are among the wedding guests and their daughter Patricia is Konstam's trainbearer.[73]

1932

February

  • 2nd - The Hitchcocks, along with their 3-year-old daughter Patricia, depart from Southampton aboard the Atlantis on a round trip. The liner is bound for Africa, South America and Mexico.[74]

April

  • 4th - The Times reports that Hitchcock will be spending the next 12 months producing, rather than directing, films for British International Pictures. Ultimately, Lord Camber's Ladies is the only film Hitchcock will produce for the company.[75]

August

  • 11th - The Times reports that Hitchcock has hired Benn Levy to direct Lord Camber's Ladies for British International Pictures.[76]

November

  • 15th - Variety reports that when Hitchcock's contract at British International Pictures expires in March 1933, the studio will not be renewing it.[77]

1933

January

  • 4th - The Times reports that Hitchcock is planning to adapt Bulldog Drummond for British International Pictures.[79]

February

  • 1st - The Times reports that Hitchcock is currently working on an adaptation of Bulldog Drummond for British International Pictures and that he had recently signed a contract to make films for the new London Film Productions company.[80]

April

  • 26th - The Gloucestershire Echo carries a report about the portrait commissioned of Hitchcock painted by deaf and mute artist Alfred Thomson. A few days later, the Western Morning News reported that the painting "shows our ablest film director dramatically placed in studio surroundings".[81][82][83]

November

December

  • 16th - The Picturegoer magazine carries an article written by Hitchcock titled "Are Stars Necessary?".
  • 19th - Variety reports that Gaumont-British has signed Hitchcock on a three-picture deal.[85]

1934

February

March

  • 5th - Waltzes from Vienna is reviewed by The Times which notes that Hitchcock has treated Jessie Matthews "as a not too important part of the film's design".[87]

April

November

  • Hitchcock and Charles Bennett spend the winter of 1934 working on the script for The 39 Steps.[89]

December

  • 10th - The Man Who Knew Too Much is reviewed by The Times who states that Hitchcock "has a rare gift for the macabre" and that "with the aid of a few shadows, a dozen stairs or so, and a sinister-looking figure, he manages to keep his audience in a suspended state of expectation."[90]
  • The Hitchcocks and Joan Harrison spend Christmas holidaying in St. Moritz.[91]

1935

January

  • 23rd - The Institute of Amateur Cinematographers award a gold medal of merit to Hitchcock at luncheon at the Savoy for the "finest film of the year made in Britain", The Man Who Knew Too Much.[92]

March

  • Several British newspapers and trade publications announce that Hitchcock's next project will be London Symphony, starring Clive Brook and based on an original story by Sir Philip Gibbs and his son, Anthony.[93]

May

August

  • 6th - The Yorkshire Post reports that Hitchcock will be one of the speakers at fortnight-long film summer school in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, organised by the Educational Handwork Association. Other speakers include British documentary film maker Mary Field and the theme of the event is to explore the use of film within education.[94][95]

November

  • 9th - Although the script for Sabotage is still under development, Hitchcock sends a second unit out to capture footage of the Lord Mayor's procession to the Law Courts for use in the film.[96]

1936

December

  • Gaumont British announces a series of cost cutting measures, resulting in the firing of Hitchcock's friends Ivor Montague and Michael Balcon. Edward "Ted" Black is brought in to replace Balcon.[97]
  • The Hitchcocks, along with Joan Harrison and Charles Bennett, spend Christmas holiday in St. Moritz. Whilst they are there, a telegram arrives from Myron Selznick offering Bennett a job in Hollywood and he accepts.[98]

1937

March

April

  • 1st - Hitchcock gives a lecture as part of the Association of Cine-Technicians' Winter Programme of lectures and film shows (1936-37).

August

  • 18th - The Hitchcocks, accompanied by their daughter Patricia and Joan Harrison, depart from Southampton to New York aboard to RMS Queen Mary.[100]
  • 24th - The Hitchcocks, accompanied by their daughter Patricia and Joan Harrison, are photographed dining in New York.
  • 27th - Hitchcock is interviewed on the Movie Club radio programme, broadcast on WHN in New York.[101]
  • 31st - Despite heavy rain, the stars turn out in New York for the premiere of William Wyler's Dead End (1937) at the Rivoli Theater. Among them are the Hitchcocks — Alma wearing a "slim pale green crepe with matching bolero" — and the film's star, Sylvia Sidney, accompanied by Norman Bel Geddes (father of Barbara Bel Geddes). The other stars of the film are Humphrey Bogart and Joel McCrea.[102]

September

  • 4th - Variety reports that Hitchcock is sailing from New York to England aboard the MV Georgic.[103][104]
  • 12th - The Hitchcocks, along with daughter Patricia and Joan Harrison, arrive into Southampton aboard the MV Georgic.[105]

October

  • The October issue of the World Film News journal carries a short news item stating that Hitchcock is working with Joan Harrison and Alma Reville to adapt a short story by French author Marcel Achard, with the intention of beginning production in November. At present, no decision has been made on casting. Newspaper reports from October confirm the title as False Witness. Instead, Hitchcock eventually takes over the existing Lost Lady project which becomes The Lady Vanishes (1938).

1938

January

  • 24th - BBC Radio broadcasts an episode of the 30-minute "The Cinema: The Director's Job" series in which Hitchcock talks about his work. The Yorkshire Post description reads, "The third of the talks on The Cinema (National, 8) is to be given by Alfred Hitchcock, the producer, who will speak about his work. Hitchcock has become outstanding among producers by reason of such successes as Blackmail some years ago, and later The Thirty Nine Steps, Secret Agent and Sabotage."[106][107]

April

  • 4th - The Manchester Guardian reports that Hitchcock purchased a painting by English artist Christopher Wood (1901-1930) for £200 at an art exhibition held at the New Burlington Galleries in London.[108][109]
  • 20th - Newspapers report that an electrician's strike has halted production of Hitchcock's latest film, The Lady Vanishes.[110]

May

  • 28th - Hitchcock judges an amateur film festival in Glasgow, Scotland. Herbert J. Arundel of Stoke-on-Trent won first prize for his film The Smugglers' Cave.[111][112]

June

  • 1st - The Hitchcocks depart from Southampton to New York aboard the RMS Queen Mary. He hopes to secure himself an American contact during the visit.[113][114]
  • 6th - The Hitchcocks arrive at New York aboard the SS Queen Mary and are met by Kay Brown. [115][116]
  • 10th - The Hitchcocks depart from New York for Hollywood.[117]
  • 15th - Hitchcock meets with David O. Selznick.[118]
  • 16th - Hitchcock meets with Sam Goldwyn.[119]
  • 23rd - Hitchcock meets for a second time with Sam Goldwyn.[120]

July

  • 2nd - David O. Selznick makes an initial contract offer to Hitchcock. The contract is below Hitchcock's expectations, but Myron Selznick insists that it will be a better offer than Sam Goldwyn can make, so Hitchcock accepts.[121]
  • 6th - Myron Selznick hosts a celebratory party for the Hitchcocks. The other guests are Dan Winkler, Clark Gable and Carole Lombard.[122]
  • 8th - The Hitchcocks travel back to New York by train.[123]
  • 12th - David O. Selznick announces that he has signed Hitchcock.[124]
  • 13th - The Hitchcocks set sail back to England aboard the SS Normandie. They plan to return to America once Jamaica Inn has been completed.[125][126]
  • 17th - An interview with Hitchcock is published in the New York Times in which the director talks about his plans to film Titanic. He claims that he persuaded the Cunard Line to agree to the film by saying, "Over the grave of the Titanic rides, in safety, the Queen Mary."[127]
  • 18th - The Hitchcocks arrived into Le Harve, aboard the SS Normandie.[128]

September

November

  • After much press speculation that Hitchcock's first American film will be about the Titanic disaster, David O. Selznick formally announces it will be an adaptation of Daphne du Maurier's Rebecca.[130]

December

  • The New York Film Critics name Hitchcock as "Best Director of 1938" for The Lady Vanishes in their annual poll. The news alarms Selznick, as his own vagueness about the actual start date for Rebecca could give Hitchcock the opportunity to make his debut US film for another studio. Selznick quickly renegotiates the contact and gives Hitchcock better terms whilst ensuring that he has the final say-so over any projects for other studios.[131]

1939

January

  • 8th - The New York Film Critics' award for Best Director of the Year goes to Hitchcock for The Lady Vanishes. Unable to attend in person, Hitchcock takes his family to BBC Broadcasting House where his acceptance speech is relayed to New York.[132]
  • 8th - The New York Film Critics' award for Best Director of the Year goes to Hitchcock for The Lady Vanishes. Unable to attend in person, Hitchcock takes his family to BBC Broadcasting House where his acceptance speech is relayed to New York.[133]

March

  • 4th - The Hitchcock family, along with Joan Harrison, set sail for their new lives in America aboard the RMS Queen Mary.[134][135]
  • 16th - The Hitchcock family and Joan Harrison leave New York by train, for a brief vacation in Florida and Havana.[136]
  • 22nd - The Hitchcock family and Joan Harrison fly from Havana, Cuba, into Miami, Florida, aboard an American Seaplane.[137]
  • 27th - The Hitchcocks arrive back in New York by train.[138]
  • 30th - Hitchcock gives a lecture at Columbia University, New York.[139]
  • 31st - The Hitchcocks leave New York by train, bound for Hollywood.[140]

April

  • 5th - The Hitchcocks arrive at the Santa Fe Railway Depot in Pasadena, California — known as the "Gateway to Hollywood" — where they are met by Myron Selznick.[141]
  • 13th - Hitchcock is a guest on The Royal Gelatin Hour, a radio variety show hosted by singer-bandleader Rudy Vallée. The other guests were American actress Kay Francis and English actor Eric Blore.[142]
  • Hitchcock cables Robert Donat urging him to consider the lead role of Maxim de Winter in Rebecca. Selznick is unconvinced — his list of potential actors includes Walter Pidgeon, Leslie Howard, Mervyn Douglas and William Powell.[143]

May

  • Hitchcock visits British actor Ronald Coleman to try and tempt him to accept the role of Maxim de Winter in Rebecca.[144]

June

  • Early in June, Hitchcock submits a lengthy treatment of Rebecca to David O. Selznick, who is "shocked beyond words" at the changes Hitch had made to Daphne du Maurier's book. Selznick dictates a length memo to Hitchcock — "We bought Rebecca and we intend to make Rebecca."[145]
  • 7th - Writing for the New York Times, C.A. Lejeune reports that following the recent UK press showing of Jamaica Inn, Hitchcock talked via long-distance telephone to several of the British journalists. She estimates the call cost Hitchcock at least $500.[146]
  • Hitchcock submits a second lengthy treatment of Rebecca, prepared with Alma, Joan Harrison and Robert E Sherwood and running to 100 pages, to David O. Selznick. Again, Selznick is unimpressed.[147]

July

  • July and August are spent on the pre-production of Rebecca, with Hitchcock and Selznick finally coming to agreement over the screenplay.

September

October

December

  • Filming on Rebecca is completed and Hitchcock hands the footage over to David O. Selznick. The lack of coverage and alternative takes frustrates Selznick as he oversees the editing the film.[150]

1940

January

  • 7th - The Los Angeles Times reports that Hitchcock is amongst those helping organise the Franco-British War Relief Dinner-Dance, which is due to be held at the Ambassador on 17 January.

February

  • At Hitchcock's request, Walter Wanger hires British writer Charles Bennett to work on the screenplay for Personal History (later retitled Foreign Correspondent) for a period of 4 weeks at $1,000 per week. Together with Hitchcock and Joan Harrison, Bennett fashions a script that pushes against the US Neutrality Acts which limit pro-war propaganda in Hollywood.[151][152]

April

June

  • 13th - Hitchcock attends the première of the Bette Davis film All This and Heaven Too at the Carthay Circle Theater in Los Angeles.[154]

July

  • 3rd - Variety reports that Hitchcock is travelling from Los Angeles to New York.[155]
  • 22nd - An adaptation of The Lodger is broadcast on US radio, apparently featuring Hitchcock (his voice was actually provided by actor Joseph Kearns), with actors Herbert Marshall and Edmund Gwenn starring as the lodger and landlord respectively. Although well received, David O. Selznick rules out Hitchcock having any further involvement with a proposed radio series. Revived in 1942, Suspense ran for 20 years and included a radio adaptation of The 39 Steps in 1952.[156]

August

September

  • 4th - Variety reports that Hitchcock is travelling from New York to Los Angeles.[159]
  • 28th - The Hitchcocks and Joan Harrison attend a Halloween party at the opening night of the Palladium ballroom on Sunset Boulevard.[160]

December

  • 12th - Loew's Grand Theatre, Atlanta, hosts the "anniversary premiere" screening of Selznick's Gone With the Wind. A plane carrying Vivien Leigh, Laurence Olivier and Hitchcock to Atlanta is unable to land due to fog and diverts to Augusta (150 miles away). Leigh, Olivier and Hitchcock miss the screening and fly back to Los Angeles the following day.[161]
  • 18th - Variety names Hitchcock as the second highest grossing director of 1940, behind Victor Fleming (Gone With the Wind).[162]

1941

February

  • 10th - Hitchcock commences filming on Suspicion for RKO, starring Cary Grant and Joan Fontaine.[163]
  • 19th - Variety reports that Hitchcock will be lecturing on "technique in melodrama" to students of the Cinematic Department of the University of California.[164]
  • 27th - The Hitchcocks attend the Academy Awards where Rebecca has 11 nominations and Foreign Correspondent has 5. Both films are nominated for "Best Production" and Rebecca wins — David O. Selznick accepts (and then keeps) the Oscar. George Barnes also takes the Oscar for "Best Cinematography".[165]

May

  • 28th - Variety reports that Hitchcock is travelling from Los Angeles to New York.[166]

June

  • Still unsure of the best ending for the film, Suspicion is shown to a test audience. The filmed ending — which sees Joan Fontaine drinking a glass of milk she believes to be poisoned only to discover Cary Grant is instead intending to commit suicide by poisoning himself — is rejected. Hitchcock later tells the New York Herald Tribune, the audience "booed [the ending], and I don't blame them." In desperation, Joan Harrison and Hitchcock eventually come up with a new ending, which is the one used in the released film.[167]
  • 27th - Hitchcock flies into LaGuardia Airport, New York, to appear as a guest expert on the NBC radio quiz show Information Please.[168]
  • George Schaefer, head of production at RKO, sends a memo to Hitchcock with a suggested new ending for Suspicion.[169] A few days later, writer Samson Raphaelson sends the director a letter with his thoughts about the ending.[170]
  • RKO, who have recently undergone a change of management, threaten to recut Suspicion to under an hour. Furious protests by Hitchcock, Myron and David O. Selznick force the studio to back down and release Hitchcock's version of the film, but not before changing the film's title from Beyond the Fact to Suspicion, much to the director's consternation (a "cheap and dull" title).[171]

July

  • David O. Selznick raises Hitchcock's salary to $3,000 per week.[172]

August

  • Hitchcock travels to New York to meet Sidney Bernstein and Victor Saville and to discuss to the possibility of making a short film for the British Ministry of Information (MoI). Hitchcock would eventually direct Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache, as well as contributing to Men of the Lightship and Target for Tonight. The three then return to Hollywood to try and persuade studio executives to allow MoI shorts to be shown prior to their main features in the theatres.[173][174]
  • 20th - Having earlier persuaded David O. Selznick to allow him to base his next film on an original story, Hitchcock submits a 134-page manuscript titled "Untitled Original Treatment by Alfred Hitchcock and Joan Harrison". The story involves an act of sabotage at an airplane factory, a cross-country chase, an explosion at a newly opened dam, and a villain falling from the Statue of Liberty. After further development on the screenplay, Selznick decides to let Hitchcock make the film for another studio and a deal is struck with Universal.[175]

November

  • Hitchcock signs Robert Cummings and Priscilla Lane as the leads for Saboteur.[176]
  • 26th - The New York Times reports that the Hitchcocks have arrived into New York by plane for a short visit.[177]

December

  • 3rd - Variety reports that Hitchcock is travelling from Los Angeles to New York.[178]
  • 7th - The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and the US entry into World War II allows Hitchcock to be more explicit about the war as he completes the pre-production of his new film, Saboteur. The director is in a meeting with Robert F. Boyle when they hear news of the attack.[179][180]
  • 17th - Hitchcock commences filming Saboteur for Universal, starring Robert Cummings and Priscilla Lane.[181][182]

1942

February

  • 9th - The French ocean liner SS Normandie catches fire in New York Harbor. Ever the opportunist, Hitchcock dispatches a Universal newsreel unit to capture footage of the beached liner for use in Saboteur. Incensed that the film implies that the Normandie fire was sabotage, the US Navy forces the scene to be cut.[183][184][185]

May

  • Over lunch at the Brown Derby, author Gordon McDonell pitches a story idea to Hitchcock about a "handsome, successful, debonair" man who visits his family in a small Californian town only for his young niece to suspect that he might be a serial killer. Initially titled "Uncle Charlie", the story becomes Shadow of a Doubt. McDonnell's original story ends with the uncle falling off a cliff after a failed attempt to silence his niece.[186][187]
  • 5th - Gordon McDonell provides Hitchcock with a typewritten version of his "Uncle Charlie" story.[188]
  • 7th - After hearing Gordon McDonell's "Uncle Charlie" story outline, Jack H. Skirball green-lights Shadow of a Doubt as Hitchcock's second film for Universal.[189]
  • 11th - The Hitchcocks complete an initial outline treatment for Shadow of a Doubt.[190]
  • 13th - Thornton Wilder wires Hitchcock from New York to say he would like to write the screenplay for Shadow of a Doubt.[191]

June

  • Taking a short break from writing, Hitchcock and Thornton Wilder fly north to Santa Rosa to scout locations for Shadow of a Doubt.[192]
  • 8th - Hitchcock sends a telegram to actress Joan Fontaine offering her the lead role in Shadow of a Doubt — "DEAR JOAN DO YOU WANT TO PLAY THE LEAD IN MY NEXT CONFIDENTIALLY BECAUSE S DOES NOT KNOW I'VE TELEGRAPHED YOU LOVE HITCH". However, she is unavailable.[193]
  • Whilst visiting Santa Rosa, Hitchcock spots local 10-year-old Edna May Wonacott skipping down the sidewalk and casts her as Teresa Wright's bookish younger sister.[194]
  • 24th - Thornton Wilder heads back to New York, accompanied by Jack H. Skirball and Hitchcock En route, they complete the script for Shadow of a Doubt.[195]
  • Hitchcock meets Teresa Wright and describes the entire plot of Shadow of a Doubt to her. She later recalls, "to have a master storyteller like Mr. Hitchcock tell you a story is a marvellous experience".[196]

July

  • Hitchcock meets with studio head Darryl F. Zanuck to discuss making a film for Twentieth Century-Fox. Hitchcock suggests a remake of The Lodger, but Zanuck isn't keen.[197]
  • 30th - The Hitchcocks travel up to Santa Rosa to begin the production of Shadow of a Doubt.[198]

August

  • 14th - For her birthday, Alfred presents Alma with a new handbag. Inside is a gold key to the front door of their new home, 10957 Bellagio Road.[199]

September

  • 26th - Alfred Hitchcock's mother Emma Jane passes away at Shamley Cottage, Shamley Green. The cause of death is given as "acute pyelonephritis, an abdominal fistula, and an intestinal perforation". She leaves effects to the value of £102 7s. 5d.

November

  • 19th - Hitchcock moves to his new offices at Twentieth Century-Fox. With Darryl F. Zanuck away on active service in North Africa, Hitchcock meets with William Goetz and staff producer Kenneth Macgowan where he pitches the idea for a "lifeboat film". Nine months later, Lifeboat would begin filming.[200]

December

  • Keen to attach a big-name writer to Lifeboat, Hitchcock telegrams Ernest Hemmingway at his winter home in Cuba — "THE WHOLE STORY TAKES PLACE IN THE LIFEBOAT WITH THE CONFLICT OF PERSONALITIES, THE DISINTEGRATION OF SOCIAL INEQUALITIES THE DOMINANCE OF THE NAZI, ETC"[201]

1943

January

  • Ernest Hemingway turns down Hitchcock's offer to write Lifeboat — "THANK HITCHCOCK FOR ASKING ME [STOP] PERHAPS WE CAN WORK TOGETHER ANOTHER TIME BEST REGARDS"[202]
  • Hitchcock and Kenneth Macgowen meet with John Steinbeck at Twentieth Century-Fox to discuss the possibility of the author writing a treatment of Lifeboat.[203]
  • 4th - Hitchcock's older brother William John dies of a cardiac arrest aggrevated by the drug paraldehyde. William leaves effects worth £110 7s. 6d. to his widow, Lilian. Shocked by his brother's early death, Hitchcock begins a strict diet in an attempt to lose 100 pounds in weight — this would lead to his memorable cameo appearance in the film Lifeboat (1944).[204]
  • 22nd - Hitchcock is a panelist on the US radio quiz show Information Please, moderated by Clifton Fadiman.[205]
  • 24th - Hitchcock is a guest on the Texaco Star Theatre show, hosted by Fred Allen.[206]

February

  • MacKinlay Kantor, who would go on to win a Pulitzer Prize, is brought in to work on the opening sequence of Lifeboat with Alma in mid-February, but is dismissed by Hitchcock two weeks later. Hitchcock later recalled "I didn't care for what he had written at all".[207]

April

  • 16th - The Los Angeles Times reports that Hitchcock is keen to cast actress Kathleen Hepburn in Lifeboat.[208] By June, Tallulah Bankhead had been signed for the film.

June

  • Alfred Hitchcock's agreement with the Sleznick Agency expires and he refuses to re-sign with Myron Selznick.[209]

August

  • Writer Angus MacPhail leaves Ealing Studios to work at the Ministry of Information and begins planning for Hitchcock's two British wartime films: Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache.[210]

November

  • Filming on Lifeboat completes in early-November. On the last day of shooting, Hitchcock presents Tallulah Bankhead with a Sealyham Terrier puppy.[211][212]

1944

January

  • 20th - Hitchcock begins filming Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache at British International Pictures' Welwyn Studios in Hertfordshire, UK.[213][214]

February

  • 25th - Hitchcock finishes filming Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache.[215][216]

March

  • 2nd - Hitchcock flies back to America, having completed Bon Voyage and Aventure Malgache in England. He cables David O. Selznick from the Saint Regis Hotel to say he'd like to write the script for Spellbound with Ben Hecht.[217][218] Hitch had been scheduled to sail back to America from Greenock, Scotland aboard the RMS Aquitania which was due to depart on the 2nd.[219]
  • 23rd - Myron Selznick, Alfred Hitchcock's first American agent, dies from an abdominal hemorrhage, aged 46. His brother, David, is at his bedside when he passes away.[220]

April

  • By the end of April, Ben Hecht and Hitchcock have completed the script for Spellbound.[221]

May

  • Ben Hecht and Hitchcock arrive back in Hollywood and begin meetings with David O. Selznick to discuss Spellbound.[222]

August

  • Hitchcock has his first meeting with Salvador Dalí to discuss the dream sequences for Spellbound.[223]
  • Hitchcock and Ben Hecht map out a treatment for Notorious.[224]
  • 30th - Hitchcock begins filming the Spellbound dream sequences designed by Salvador Dalí. The sequences take nearly an entire month to film.[225][226]
  • 31st - Hitchcock signs a new contract with David O. Selznick, which more than doubles his salary.[227]

September

  • 15th - Hitchcock meets with RKO producer William Dozier at Chasen's Restaurant, where he outlines the plot of a story that will eventually become Notorious. Dozier is keen for RKO to purchase the story, but David O. Selznick overrules and decides it should be a Selznick International Pictures film.[228]

October

  • 15th - Hitchcock arrives in London. Much to David O. Selznick's annoyance, Hitchcock uses up his 12 weeks of holiday to meet with Sidney Bernstein in order to continue their discussions about creating a new film company.[229]
  • 15th - Hitchcock arrives in London. Much to David O. Selznick's annoyance, Hitchcock uses up his 12 weeks of holiday to meet with Sidney Bernstein in order to continue their discussions about creating a new film company.[230]

November

  • 21st - Eliot Stannard, one of England's most prolific screenwriters, dies aged 56. He wrote (or co-wrote) the scenarios for Hitchcock's The Pleasure Garden (1925), The Mountain Eagle (1926), Downhill (1927), The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog (1927), The Ring (1927), Champagne (1928), Easy Virtue (1928), The Farmer's Wife (1928) and The Manxman (1929).

December

  • Hitchcock and Ben Hecht continue working on Notorious.[231]
  • Hitchcock returns from London in time for Christmas. David O. Selznick gives the go-ahead for Notorious to be Hitchcock's next film.[232] During Hitchcock's absence, Selznick hired William Cameron Menzies to reshoot some of the scenes in Spellbound's dream sequence — when Salvador Dalí finally saw the finished film, he was reportedly very disappointed with the changes made to his designs.[233]
  • 26th - Hitchcock and Ben Hecht arrive in Washington and spend the evening "roughing out a script" for Watchtower Over Tomorrow.[234][235]

1945

May

  • Hitchcock receives a letter from the FBI warning him that, if Notorious contains a depiction of an American intelligence officer, it will need to be vetted by the State Department. In later years, Hitchcock will joke about the FBI keeping him "under surveillance".[236]
  • 11th - Hitchcock records a pilot episode of a proposed series titled Once Upon a Midnight, an adaptation of Anthony Berkeley's 1931 novel, Malice Aforethought.

June

  • In late June, Hitchcock travels to London for a third meeting with Sidney Bernstein about setting up their new company, Transatlantic Pictures.[237]

July

  • In late July, Hitchcock returns from his meeting with Sidney Bernstein in London.[238]

1946

February

  • 17th - Hitchcock appears as a guest on The Fred Allen Show.[239]
  • U.S. local newspapers report that David O. Selznick is close to signing Laurence Olivier to start in Hitchcock's next film, The Paradine Case.[240]

March

  • The Hitchcocks and production assistant Barbara Keon work on the script for The Paradine Case.[241]

April

  • 11th - The creation of Transatlantic Pictures, a joint project of Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein, is announced in the press.[242]

May

  • Hitchcock visits London to discuss potential material for Transatlantic Pictures' debut film with Sidney Bernstein, and to scout for locations that could be used in footage for the The Paradine Case — this includes a trip northwards to Cumbria with unit manager Fred Ahern. Hitchcock then travels on to Nice, France, to search for a French actress should Alida Valli be unable to star in The Paradine Case.[243]
  • 25th - Hitchcock flies from Paris, France, to New York aboard TWA flight NC86513. The flight arrives into New York on the 26th.[244]

August

  • Having returned from London and France, Hitchcock continues work on The Paradine Case screenplay.[245]
  • 17th - According to newspaper reports, Hitchcock was one of many Hollywood notables dining at Lucy's on Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, when two armed men entered and beat up former convinct James Utley who was seated in the restaurant.[246]

December

  • In early December, David O. Selznick and Hitchcock work for two weeks with Ben Hecht on finishing The Paradine Case screenplay.[247]
  • 6th - At 9:30pm, BBC Radio North broadcasts "Continuous Performance: The Silent Film", an hour-long documentary which features a contribution by Hitchcock. Stewart Granger is the narrator.[248]
  • 24th - Ben Hecht's Christmas radio play Miracle of a Bum is broadcast during the evening on the ABC network. According to several contemporary sources, Hitchcock directed and provided a narration.[249]

1947

February

  • Several U.S. local newspapers carry a report that Hitchcock's new puppy bit his ear and the director was left with an infection.[250]

May

  • Playwright Irving Fiske files a law suit against Cary Grant and Hitchcock for infringing upon his work "Hamlet in Modern English". Hitchcock had a previously announced plans to make a modern-language version of Hamlet in 1945, although the project was soon dropped. Fiske sought damages of $1,250,000 and the case was eventually heard in October 1954.

June

October

  • The House Committee on Un-American Activities begins a series of hearings in Washington D.C. to root out Communist influences in Hollywood. Among those affected by the subsequent Hollywood blacklist with links to Hitchcock are writers Arthur Laurents and Dorothy Parker, actors Hume Cronyn, Norman Lloyd and Canada Lee, actress Barbara Bel Geddes, and composer Lyn Murray.[252][253]

December

  • 6th - To celebrate the imminent start of filming on the first Transatlantic Pictures production, Rope, Hitchcock hosts a party at his Bellagio Road home. Among the guests are Sidney Bernstein and his wife, Arthur Laurents, Whitfield Cook, John Hodiak, Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant.[254]

1948

January

  • 22nd - Principal photography begins on Rope, Hitchcock's first film for Transatlantic Pictures, starring James Stewart, John Dall and Farley Granger. Although filming is completed within 8 days, Hitchcock is unhappy with the studio sunset and decides to reshoot the final 5 reels of the film, which takes a further 9 days.[255]

February

  • 21st - The Hitchcocks spend the weekend at their Scotts Valley, celebrating the end of filming on Rope. Among their guests are Hume Cronyn and Whitfield Cook.[256]

March

May

June

  • 7th - Hitchcock returns to Hollywood for a week to approve post-production work on Rope and to work on the film's trailer. After that, he returns to join his wife and daughter in London.[260]
  • 24th - Hitchcock attends a London Music Festival concert at the Harringay Arena.[261]
  • 28th - A press event is held at the London headquarters of Transatlantic Pictures to announce that Michael Wilding will star opposite Ingrid Bergman in Hitchcock's next feature film, Under Capricorn.[262]

September

  • 22nd - Hitchcock gives a guest lecture to the British Kinematograph Society entitled "Production Methods Compared". The lecture starts at 7:15pm with refreshments and is held at the G.B. Theatre, Film House, Wardour Street, W1.[263][264][265]

October

  • Principal photography on Under Capricorn is completed in October and Hitchcock flies back to Hollywood, having spent over 6 months in England.[266]
  • 9th - Hitchcock flies from London to New York aboard American Overseas Airlines flight 131/09. The plane lands in New York on the 10th.
  • 23rd - Hitchcock and Ingrid Bergman take part in a photoshoot in London.[267]

November

  • 2nd - The Hitchcocks host a dinner at their Bellagio Road home for Whitfield Cook and Hume Cronyn, whilst listening to the results of the election — Harry Truman is reelected.[268]
  • 27th - The Hitchcocks spend the Thanksgiving weekend at their Scotts Valley ranch, accompanied by Whitfield Cook.[269]

December

  • 31st - Whitfield Cook hosts a lavish New Year's Eve party in Hollywood. Among the many guests are the Hitchcocks, Sally Benson, Farley Granger, Arthur Laurents, Charlie Chaplin, Shelley Winters and director Joseph Losey.[270]
  • The Hitchcocks spend Christmas at their Scotts Valley ranch. Their daughter Patricia has flown back to join them for the holiday season. Among their guests on Christmas Day are Whitfield Cook, Arthur Laurents and Joan Harrison.[271]

1949

January

  • The Hitchcocks start the year with a vacation at the Racquet Club in Palm Springs, a resort founded by actors Charles Farrell and Ralph Bellamy — Farrell is married to retired actress Virginia Valli who starred in The Pleasure Garden (1925).[272]
  • The Hitchcocks and Whitfield Cook begin regular script conferences for Stage Fright.[273]
  • 30th - The Screen Directors' Playhouse broadcasts a radio adaptation of Mr and Mrs Smith, starring Robert Montgomery and Mary Jane Croft. Hitchcock provide an introduction and closing remarks to the adaptation.[274]

February

  • English serial killer John George Haigh, known as the "Acid Bath Murderer", is arrested. He was found guilty in July and then executed in August. Hitchcock follows the arrest and trial with fascination and will later try to incorporate aspects of Haigh case into the Kaleidoscope project.[275]

March

  • 24th - Actress Jane Wyman wins an Oscar for her role in Johnny Belinda. Shortly afterwards, Hitchcock contacts her to offer her the lead in Stage Fright.[276]

April

  • Hitchcock sends Marlene Dietrich a copy of the script treatment for Stage Fright in early April. She writes back, "I like it very much, knowing that you are going to do it."[277]
  • 28th - The Hitchcocks and Whitfield Cook depart from New York City to London aboard the RMS Queen Elizabeth. During the voyage, Hitchcock comes down with a dose of flu and takes to bed. Cook completes a new draft of Stage Fright before they arrive at Southampton.[278]

May

  • 3rd - The Hitchcocks arrive into Southampton aboard the RMS Queen Elizabeth and then travel on to London where they stay at the Savoy.[279]
  • 7th - The Hitchcocks spend the weekend with Sidney Bernstein and his wife at their farmstead in Kent. Bernstein screens a print of Bob Hopes' new film, Sorrowful Jones.[280]

September

  • 22nd - Hitchcock departs from Southampton to New York aboard the RMS Queen Mary.[281]
  • 27th - Hitchcock arrives into New York aboard the RMS Queen Mary.

1950

January

  • 15th - The Hitchcocks fly from Paris, France, to New York aboard TWA flight 971/15. The flight lands in New York on the 16th.

August

  • Hitchcock begins regular script meetings for Strangers on a Train with Raymond Chandler at the novelist's house in La Jolla in early August. The meetings become increasingly awkward, party due to Chandler's alcoholism. When Chandler breaks into a drunk rant about the script, Hitchcock walks out telling his associate producer Barbara Keon that "he's through" and begins looking for a replacement writer.[282]
  • 30th - Hitchcock returns to Los Angeles after filming is completed at Forest Hills.[283]
  • Although the film's script isn't completed, Hitchcock shoots second-unit footage for Strangers on a Train at Forest Hills, New York City, including Davis Cup sequences.[284]

September

  • 10th - Hitchcock appears alongside composer Bernard Herrmann on New York radio station WCBS's Invitation to Music, presented by James Fassett. Amongst the music played were Chopin's Piano Concerto no. 2 and selections from William Walton's score for the film Hamlet (1948).[285]

October

  • Hitchcock hires Czenzi Ormonde to write script for Strangers on a Train. At their first script meeting, Hitchcock pinched his nose, picked up Raymond Chandler's script for the film with his thumb and forefinger and then theatrically dropped it into the nearest waste paper basket. After spending a couple of weeks working with Ormonde, Barbara Keon takes over and the two women work non-stop to complete the script.[286]

November

  • 16th - The Screen Directors' Playhouse broadcasts a radio adaptation of Lifeboat, starring Tallulah Bankhead and Jeff Chandler. Hitchcock provides a short introduction to the adaptation.[287]

December

  • With filming on Strangers on a Train completed, the Hitchcocks celebrate their 25th wedding anniversary by spending Christmas at St. Mortiz.[288]

1951

January

  • 25th - The Screen Directors' Playhouse broadcasts a radio adaptation of Spellbound, starring Joseph Cotten and Mercedes McCambridge. Hitchcock provides an introduction and linking narration.[289]

March

  • At the end of March, the Hitchcocks embark on a two-month long European vacation with their daughter, Patricia. They ship their car ahead and collect it in Naples, with Alma driving the family to Capri, Rome (where they meet with Ingrid Bergman, Florence, Venice and Villa d'Este by the shores of Lake Como.[290]

April

  • The Hitchcocks continue their European vacation. Leaving Italy, they travel to Austria, visiting Innsbruck, then on to Germany, visiting Bavaria, Munich and Berlin. Finally, they visit Paris before ending their vacation in London.[291]

May

  • 20th - The Hitchcock family fly into Montreal, Québec, Canada, from London aboard British Airways flight 601/377. They then tour Montreal and Quebec City — the latter would become the location for I Confess. Finally, the Hitchcocks drive down the Maine Coast to Boston and New York City, ending their two-month long vacation.[292]

October

1952

January

  • 3rd - Hitchcock signs a $999,000 contract with Warner Brothers to produce and direct 4 films over the next 7 years.[295]

February

  • 3rd - Pleased with the terms of his new contact with Warner Brothers, Hitchcock offers to direct, without salary, one extra film at the end of the contract — this will turn out to be The Wrong Man.[296]
  • Alma and Alfred Hitchcock travel to Quebec to scout locations for I Confess.[297]

March

  • The Hitchcocks travel to New York to meet writer William Archibald, who is hired to work on the I Confess screenplay.[298]

April

  • Warner Bros object to elements of the screenplay for I Confess, including the ending which has the priest being executed, forcing Hitchcock and Barbara Keon to hastily rewrite the scenes.[299]
  • Hitchcock, Sidney Bernstein and writer George Tabori travel to Quebec to scout locations and hire local actors for I Confess. Local priest Father Paul La Couline is hired as a technical consultant and to act as a liaison with the Catholic Church.[300]

July

August

  • 21st - I Confess principal photography begins in Quebec. Hitchcock hires Barbara Keon to work on several of the film's more difficult scenes.[303]

September

  • 10th - The Los Angeles Times carries a brief report that Cary Grant is keen to star in a Hitchcock adaptation of David Dodge's book To Catch a Thief. They report the actor as saying, "I read the book some time ago and loved it. If Alfred Hitchcock, who's to direct the picture, gets a good movie script from the story we'll have more conversation about my doing the film."[304]

October

December

  • The Hitchcocks celebrate their wedding anniversary at the Palace Hotel, St. Moritz.[306]

1953

March

  • Financial woes at Warner Bros. result in the studio halting production on all new projects for 90 days and studio executives are later asked to take a salary cut of up to 50%. This prompts Hitchcock to ask his agent Lew Wasserman to shop around for a new contract with a different studio — Wasserman eventually secures a lucrative deal with Paramount Studios on the proviso that Hitchcock adapts a story from a collection they've optioned by writer Cornell Woolrich as his first film.[307]

April

  • With Warner Bros pushing Hitchcock to make a film in 3D, the director abandons The Bramble Bush in favour of Dial M for Murder, which can be more easily shot on a sound stage with the bulky 3D cameras.[308]
  • 17th - Mary Alma O'Connell, daughter of Joseph E. O'Connell, Jr. and Patricia Hitchcock, and granddaughter of Alfred and Alma Hitchcock, is born.

September

October

  • Grace Kelly's agent telephones her to let her know she has been offered the role of "Lisa" in Rear Window. Kelly has already been offered the lead role opposite Marlon Brando in On The Waterfront, but jumps at the chance to work with Hitchcock again.[310][311]

November

  • 27th - Principal photography begins Hitchcock's first film for Paramount, Rear Window, starring James Stewart and Grace Kelly. The first sequence to be filmed is the complex opening title sequence — 10 takes are required before Robert Burks is happy.[312][313][314]

1954

January

  • 24th - At the 3rd annual Screen Director's Guild awards dinner-dance, Hitchcock presented an award to director Charles Walters and assistant director James Jennings for Lili (1953).[315]

February

  • 7th - The Los Angeles Times reports that the Hitchcocks have left to spend time at the ranch at Scotts Valley, Santa Cruz.[316]
  • The Production Code Administration office rejects the initial cut of Rear Window, in particular raising objections to scenes where Miss Torso appears to be topless. According to John Michael Hayes, Hitchcock had done this on purpose to divert their attention from other parts of the film that he had suspected they might object to. The scene is easily replaced with an alternative non-topless take.[317]
  • 23rd - John Michael Hayes and Hitchcock complete a 9 page story outline of To Catch a Thief.[318]

March

  • 16th - Hitchcock sends a memo to Paramount's Hugh Brown asking his department to research if there will be any street carnivals taking place in Nice after May 15th that they could incorporate into the filming of the flower market scene in To Catch a Thief.[319]

April

  • With the budget for To Catch a Thief escalating towards $3,000,000, Hitchcock begins cutting unnecessary scenes from the script, including a planned police chase through a street carnival.[320][321]

May

  • On his way to France, Hitchcock announces The Trouble With Harry to the press in New York City, telling them that, "It's the story of a body found by a 4-year-old boy and what happens to it thereafter. It's set in England but I hope to shoot it in New England this fall."[322]
  • Hitchcock dispatches a second unit, headed by Herbert Coleman, to the south of France to photograph background scenes and auto chase footage for To Catch a Thief.[323]
  • 10th - Hitchcock arrives into Southampton from New York aboard the RMS Queen Elizabeth. He is listed as staying in London at Claridge's hotel.[324]
  • The prinipal cast members of To Catch a Thief — Cary Grant, Grace Kelly, Jessie Royce Landis and John Williams — arrive in Cannes where they stay at the Carlton Hotel. John Michael Hayes joins them where he works with Hitchcock to tighten the screenplay.[325][326]

June

  • André Bazin, co-founder of Cahiers du Cinéma, visits Hitchcock during the filming of To Catch a Thief's flower market scene, and interviews him for the journal.[327]
  • 21st - Paramount studio executives demonstrate the studio's new VistaVision format at a press and industry event at the newly refurbished Paramount Cinema in Paris. Hitchcock's To Catch a Thief is one of the first VIstaVision films.[328]
  • 29th - The Hitchcocks fly from Paris, France, to New York aboard TWA flight 951/28. The flight lands in New York on the 29th.

July

  • 2nd - Teresa O'Connell, daughter of Joseph E. O'Connell, Jr. and Patricia Hitchcock, and granddaughter of Alfred and Alma Hitchcock, is born.
  • 27th - Following discussions with Hitchcock over the draft script, John Michael Hayes submits a revised 134-page green script for The Trouble With Harry.[329]

August

  • 13th - Filming on To Catch a Thief is temporarily halted to celebrate Hitchcock's birthday. Costume designer Oleg Cassini later recalled that Hitchcock's secretary announced, "Could I have your attention for a moment please? Would you all come into the other room, please, and have a piece of Mr. Hitchcake's cock!"[330]
  • 30th - After considering several options for To Catch a Thief's final scene with Hitchcock, John Michael Hayes submits the ending used in the film and it becomes one of the final scenes to be filmed.[331]
  • Hitchcock dispatches Herbert Coleman to New York to look for a suitable lead actress for The Trouble with Harry, where he watches Shirley MacLaine standing in for Carol Haney in musical The Pajama Game. The following day, Coleman arranges a screen test for MacLaine.[332]

September

  • 4th - Principle photography on To Catch a Thief is completed and the film moves into post-production. Hitchcock boards the 8pm Santa Fe Super Chief at Los Angeles's Union Station to New York via Chicago. Once in New York, Hitchcock stays at the St. Regis Hotel where he meets Shirley MacLaine for the first time — when MacLaine admits to her lack of acting experience, Hitchcock says "All this simply means that I shall have fewer bad knots to untie."[333]
  • 12th - TV show What's My Line? features Hitchcock as the mystery celebrity guest.[334]
  • 14th - Hitchcock and John Michael Hayes complete changes requested by the Production Code Administration to the script for The Trouble with Harry.[335]

October

  • The October edition of Cahiers du Cinéma is devoted entirely to Hitchcock.[336]
  • The law suit originally filed by Irving Fiske in 1947, which claimed Hitchcock and Cary Grant had plagiarised Fiske's concept of a modern-language version of Hamlet, is heard at New York Federal Court with Judge William Bondy presiding. Fiske sought $750,000 in damages. After 11 days of detailed testimony, including key statements by Maurice Evans, Judge Bondy halted the trial and directed the jury to find the case "not proven". Hitchcock, who was busy filming The Trouble with Harry, did not attend the trial. Fiske was later ordered to pay $5,000 towards the director's legal costs.
  • 13th - Whilst shooting in the indoor school gymnasium set, a 850lb crane-mounted VistaVision camera crashes to the floor grazing Hitchcock's shoulder and pinning crew member Michael Seminerio to the ground. Fortunately neither the director or Seminerio are seriously injured.[337]
  • 14th - Due to the unpredictable weather, Hitchcock decides to end location shooting and film the remaining scenes back on the Paramount sound stages, leaving behind Herbert Coleman and the second unit to capture the remaining exterior landscape shots, using stand-in doubles for the actors. The News & Citizen, the local newspaper for Morrisville, Vermont, reported that "Hollywood's experiment with making an entire motion picture in Vermont ended Thursday as director-producer Alfred Hitchcock and his cast leave for their home studios after bucking Vermont's unpredictable weather for more than a month."[338]

November

  • After many years of trying to hire Bernard Herrmann, Hitchcock finally secures the composer to create the score for The Trouble with Harry.[339]

December

  • With the filming of The Trouble with Harry complete, Alma and Alfred Hitchcock travel to St. Moritz for their annual Christmas holiday.[340] On route to Switzerland, they stop off for a week in London where they take in several West End plays. Asked by the press if he intends to ski, he replied "I hope not. No, definitely no. I'll watch some skiing but I just like sitting in my room at the hotel and looking at the snow."[341]

1955

January

  • Returning for their Christmas holiday in St. Moritz, the Hitchcocks travel to Paris in early January to oversee the French dubbing of To Catch a Thief. Whilst there, Hitchcock meets with François Truffaut and Claude Chabrol for a Cahiers du Cinéma interview. After Truffaut and Chabrol manage to accidentally fall into an icy pond on their way to meet Hitchcock, damaging their tape recorder in the process, they reschedule and meet that evening at the Plaza-Athénée Hotel.[342]
  • Returning for their Christmas holiday in St. Moritz, the Hitchcocks travel to Paris in early January to oversee the French dubbing of To Catch a Thief. Whilst there, Hitchcock meets with François Truffaut and Claude Chabrol for a Cahiers du Cinéma interview. After Truffaut and Chabrol manage to accidentally fall into an icy pond on their way to meet Hitchcock, damaging their tape recorder in the process, they reschedule and meet that evening at the Plaza-Athénée Hotel.[343]
  • Hitchcock meets with composer Bernard Herrmann to discuss the score for The Trouble with Harry.[344]
  • 11th - The Hitchcocks depart from Southampton aboard the SS Liberte, bound for New York.
  • The Hitchcocks return to Bel-Air from Paris, where work commences on the script for The Man Who Knew Too Much with Angus MacPhail.[345]
  • 17th - The Hitchcocks arrive into New York aboard the SS Liberte.

February

  • It now seems highly likely that Doris Day will play a lead role in The Man Who Knew Too Much. Hitchcock and Angus MacPhail work on developing the character of Jo McKenna to make her a retired singer.[346]
  • John Michael Hayes, now free from other work commitments, joins Hitchcock to work on The Man Who Knew Too Much. The director apparently neglects to tell Hayes that Angus MacPhail had already been working on the film's plot line for the last two months which ultimately leads to Hayes formally objecting to MacPhail receiving a screen credit.[347]

April

  • 3rd - The BBC Radio Light Programme broadcasts a portrait of Hitchcock with contributions from Michael Balcon, Tallulah Bankhead, Ingrid Bergman, Alma Reville, Frank Mills and James Stewart.[348][349]
  • 20th - Hitchcock meets Doris Day to discuss The Man Who Knew Too Much.[350]
  • 20th - Hitchcock swears American citizenship. En route to the courthouse, Herbert Coleman reportedly asks the director if he was having second thoughts, "No, but the Hitchcock name goes back almost to the beginning of the British Empire and you can imagine what a serious thing it is for me to break away." At the courthouse, his official witnesses are MCA agent Arthur Park and actor Joseph Cotten.[351][352]
  • 23rd - Hitchcock leaves the US to travel to London to scout locations for The Man Who Knew Too Much.[353]

June

August

  • Hitchcock meets with Angus MacPhail in late August to discuss the The Wrong Man script.[355]

September

  • 25th - Hitchcock and Shirley MacLaine appear as guests on the NBC Radio series Monitor where they promote The Trouble with Harry.
  • 30th - The world premiere of The Trouble with Harry takes place in Barre, Vermont, with Shirley MacLaine and Hitchcock as the guests of honour at a civic dinner.[356]

October

  • 2nd - Alfred Hitchcock Presents premiers on US TV, with the Hitchcock directed episode "Revenge".
  • Alma and Alfred Hitchcock depart from New York aboard the RMS Queen Mary to travel to France, Germany and Italy to oversee the foreign language dubbing of The Trouble with Harry.[357]
  • 24th - The Hitchcocks arrive into Southampton from New York aboard the RMS Queen Mary. They are listed as then staying at Claridge's hotel in London.[358]

November

  • 13th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Breakdown", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • The Hitchcocks tour Asia to promote The Trouble with Harry, visiting Inida, Japan, Thailand and Hong Kong.[359]

December

  • 3rd - Concerns start to grow after the aircraft the Hitchcocks are travelling on from India to the Far East fails to arrive in Singapore. There are fears that it may have crashed into the Bay of Bengal. The Hitchcocks were due to be the guests of Singaporean businessman Loke Wan Tho, who had organised a cocktail party and formal dinner. Still no news had arrived the following day and Loke commented to the press, "I am completely baffled."[360][361]
  • 4th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "The Case of Mr. Pelham", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • 5th - The mystery of Hitchcock's disappearance is resolved when newspapers report that the plane he was travelling on from India to the Far East was delayed leaving Calcutta due to engine problems. Not long after take-off, a re-occurrence of the problem forced the flight to turn back over the Bay of Bengal and return to Calcutta. Issues around the complex Indian customs and immigrations procedures meant that the passengers were forced to remain on the aircraft until repairs were completed. Speaking to the press, Hitchcock said, "Let's put it this way. It's the strangest flight I've ever been on."[362]
  • 16th - The Hitchcocks depart from Tokyo, Japan, aboard Pan Am flight 856/16, bound for Honolulu. They land on the 17th at 2:30am.[363]
  • 22nd - The Hitchcocks, with their daughter Patricia, and Joan Harrison depart at 9pm from Honolulu to Los Angeles aboard Pan Am flight 510/22[364]

1956

January

  • Hitchcock meets with Maxwell Anderson to discuss The Wrong Man screenplay. Hitchcock is increasinly unhappy with the dialogue and hires Angus MacPhail to work on the script.[365]
  • 2nd - Actress Vera Miles begins a 5 year, 3 picture exclusive contract to Hitchcock.[366]
  • 13th-16th - Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Back for Christmas".[367]
  • Hitchcock, Henry Fonda and Vera Miles travel to Florida to meet the Balestrero family, to help prepare the actors for The Wrong Man. [368]

February

  • Hitchcock travels to New York, to scout locations for The Wrong Man and to talk to those involved with the Balestrero trial.[369]

March

  • 4th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Back for Christmas", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • 7th - Prior to filming on The Wrong Man commencing, Hitchcock hosts a "Ghost-Haunted House Party" on East 80th Street. The menu contains such delights as "corpse croquettes, barbecued banshee, ghoulish goulash and formaldehyde frappe."[370]
  • 8th - Hitchcock meets Vera Miles at Newart Airport.[371]

April

  • 18th - Grace Kelly marries Rainier III, Prince of Monaco. Although Hitchcock was invited to the ceremony, he declined.[372]

May

  • 22nd - Paramount hosts a charity gala permiere for The Man Who Knew Too Much in California. Hitchcock attends, along with James Stewart and Doris Day.[373]

June

  • 18th - The Hitchcocks arrive into Southampton from New York aboard the RMS Queen Elizabeth and book into Claridge's hotel in London.[374]
  • 19th - The Hitchcocks meet up in London with Robert Burks, Herbert Coleman and Angus MacPhail in order to talk with staff from the British Colonial Office to discuss plans for the director's next project, Flamingo Feather. From there, they travel on to Europe and then South Africa to scout locations and to visit Hitch's aunt Emma Mary Rhodes (who dies in September). It soon becomes obvious that the logistics of shooting a film in southern Africa will be too much and Hitchcock decides to abandon the project.[375]

July

  • 26th - The Hitchcocks depart from Southampton aboard the RMS Queen Elizabeth, bound for New York. With them are Herbert Coleman, C.O. "Doc" Erickson and Alfred's sister, Ellen Kathleen. They arrive into New York on the 31st.

August

  • 22nd - Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Wet Saturday".[376]

September

  • 1st - Hitchcock's aunt Emma Mary Rhodes dies in Durban, South Africa, aged 87.
  • 30th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Wet Saturday", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

October

  • With plans to film Flamingo Feather abandoned, Hitchcock turns his attention to the French novel D'Entre Les Morts by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac, which will eventually be filmed as Vertigo. Maxwell Anderson is charged with adapting the book, and James Stewart and Vera Miles are expected to star.[377]
  • Maxwell Anderson submits his adaption of D'Entre Les Morts, entitled "Darkling I Listen". Hitchcock finds it deeply unsatisfactory, and two other writers will work on the screenplay before Vertigo is ready to be filmed.[378]

December

  • 23rd - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Mr. Blanchard's Secret", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

1957

January

  • 9th-11th - Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "One More Mile to Go".[379]
  • 12th - Feeling unwell, Hitchcock is confined to bed.[380]
  • 17th-19th - Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "The Perfect Crime".[381]
  • 17th - Still in pain, Hitchcock is admitted to the Cedars of Lebanon hospital[382] where he undergoes surgery for a navel hernia. He is also diagnosed as suffering from colitis.[383][384]

February

March

  • 9th - Hitchcock is rushed to the Cedars of Lebanon hospital[387], where he is operated on to remove obstructing gallstones on March 11th. He spends the rest of March in hospital.[388]

April

  • 7th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "One More Mile to Go", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • 9th - Hitchcock finally returns home from hospital. He spends the rest of April recuperating at home from the gallstones operation.[389]
  • Hitchcock, Lew Wasserman, Herman Citron and James Stewart meet at the end of April to discuss who should play the role of Madeleine/Judy in Vertigo. Wasserman favours rising star Kim Novak instead of the pregnant Vera Miles.[390]

May

  • Hitchcock holds Vertigo script meetings with Samuel A. Taylor during the first week of May.[391]
  • Hitchcock holds script meetings with Joan Harrison during the first week of May to discuss the Suspicion episode "Four O'Clock".[392]
  • 9th - Herbert Coleman writes to Kay Selby at Paramount British Productions Ltd. in London asking for her help in tracking down a recording of Norman O'Neill's score for the 1920 production of J.M. Barrie's play Mary Rose. Hitchcock is keen for Bernard Herrmann to hear the recording and use it as a guide for Vertigo.[393]

June

  • Over lunch in late June, at Hitchcock's home on Bellagio Road, Kim Novak voices her concerns about playing Madeleine in Vertigo. Samuel A. Taylor is also present.[394]

July

  • Hitchcock directs the Suspicion television episode "Four O'Clock" in late July.[395][396][397]

August

  • Ernest Lehman expresses his doubts about adapting The Wreck of the Mary Deare to Hitchcock. Instead, Hitchcock suggests that they work on an original idea for a film, which will eventually become North by Northwest.[398]
  • Hitchcock holds final script meetings with Samuel A. Taylor to refine the script for Vertigo.[399]

September

  • 30th - Hitchcock begins filming Vertigo in San Francisco.[400]

October

  • 14th - Journalist Otis L. Guernsey, Jr. writes to Hitchcock handing over his idea of a innocent man who is mistaken for a fictional spy. Together with screenwriter Ernest Lehman, the director expands the concept into the screenplay for North by Northwest. Guernsey receives $10,000 from MGM for the transfer of story rights.[401]
  • 20th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "The Perfect Crime", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

November

  • 4th - Hitchcock hosts an Alfred Hitchcock Presents party at the Coconut Grove (part of the Ambassador Hotel, Los Angeles) for TV magazine editors.[402]
  • 6th - Hitchcock hosts a "Chuckwagon Diner" party at Republic Studios for newspaper columnists.[403]
  • 14th - Over lunch, Hitchcock offers Vertigo actress Barbara Bel Geddes the staring role in the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Lamb to the Slaughter".[404]

December

  • 16th - Hitchcock shoots Vertigo's famous "revolving kiss" scene. On the second take, James Stewart slips and falls -- filming is interrupted for an hour whilst Stewart visits the studio doctor.[405]
  • 18th - Hitchcock shoots Vertigo's opening rooftop chase sequence.[406]
  • 19th - Around lunchtime, Hitchcock shoots his cameo scene for Vertigo.[407]
  • With filming on Vertigo completed, Alfred Hitchcock and Alma spend Christmas holidaying in Miama and Montego Bay, along with a brief trip to Cuba. They are accompanied by Lew Wasserman and his wife.[408]

1958

February

  • 18th-19th - Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Lamb to the Slaughter".[409]

March

  • 16th - Hitchcock returns to Los Angeles from London.[410]

April

  • 3rd - Hitchcock receives a letter from the London Symphony Orchestra (dated 19 March) explaining why they were unable to complete the recording of the score for Vertigo.[411]
  • 13th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Lamb to the Slaughter", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

June

  • 1st - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "A Dip in the Pool", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • 9th - The British Daily Mail newspaper reports that someone apparently impersonating Hitchcock had walked into a job centre in Sussex and said, "I'm making a film. I want a large number of men as extras." The incident was reported to the local police.[412]

September

  • 7th - British film director Graham Cutts, who worked with the young Hitchcock at Gainsborough Pictures in the 1920s, dies aged 72.
  • 15th - Hitchcock arrives in Rapid City, South Dakota, to film sequences at Mount Rushmore for North by Northwest.

October

  • 5th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Poison", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

December

1959

January

  • Hitchcock spends January and February editing North by Northwest.[415]

February

  • 27th - Kathleen O'Connell, daughter of Joseph E. O'Connell, Jr. and Patricia Hitchcock, and granddaughter of Alfred and Alma Hitchcock, is born.

March

April

May

  • 2nd - The first episode of the six-part Tactic series is broadcast by NBC with the intention to help dispel some taboos around cancer. It features a 12-minute segment with Hitchcock.
  • 3rd - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Banquo's Chair", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • Hitchcock, Herbert Coleman, Henry Bumstead and Samuel Taylor return to Los Angeles from London in late May. Despite the careful pre-production work, No Bail for the Judge is soon abandoned, partly due to Audrey Hepburn's concern about the rape scene.[418]

June

  • 12th - The Hitchcocks arrive in New York.[419]

July

August

September

  • 27th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Arthur", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

October

  • 1st - The Hitchcocks depart from Los Angeles on an European publicity tour for North by Northwest, calling at London and Paris.[421][422]
  • 4th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "The Crystal Trench", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • 19th - Hitchcock appears as a special guest on the popular BBC Radio programme Desert Island Discs.
  • 23rd - The Motion Picture Daily reports that Hitchcock has left New York, bound for London.[423]

November

  • Actress Janet Leigh meets Hitchcock for the first time at his home on Bellagio Road where he outlines his plans for Psycho. She later wrote, "He outlined his modus operandi. The angles and shots of each scene were predetermined, carefully charted before the picture began. There could be no deviations. His camera was absolute. Within the boundary of the lens circumference, the player was given freedom, as long as the performance didn't interfere with the already designed move [...] This was the way the man worked. And since I had profound respect for his results, I would earnestly comply."[424]

1960

February

April

  • Trade journals begin to report that Hitchcock's next project will be an adaptation of Arthur David Beaty's novel Village of Stars.
  • 2nd - The Hitchcocks leave the US to start a publicity tour around Europe and Asia for Psycho, visiting Honolulu, Sydney, Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong, Singapore, Rome, Naples, and Paris.[426][427]
  • 26th - Hitchcock reads an article about a bird attack in La Jolla, California, which reminds him of Daphne du Maurier's short story that he had recently read when it was published in the 1959 Alfred Hitchcock Presents Fourteen of My Favorites in Suspense anthology.[428][429]
  • 28th - Hitchcock arrives into Singapore to promote Psycho (1960).[430]

May

  • 9th - Hitchcock is interviewed at the Australia Hotel in Sydney, Australia. Partway through the interview, he accidentally kicked his shoe off and is later photographed retrieving it from beneath a chair.

June

  • 9th - Hitchcock arrives into New York towards the end of the around-the-world publicity tour for Psycho (1960).[431]
  • 15th - Hitchcock arrives into Philadelphia to promote Psycho.[432]
  • 17th - Hitchcock arrives into Boston to promote Psycho.[433]
  • 20th - Hitchcock arrives into Chicago to promote Psycho.[434]
  • 21st - Hitchcock returns to Los Angeles.[435]

July

  • 5th - BBC television broadcasts an interview between Hitchcock and Robert Robinson as part of the Picture Parade series.[436]

September

October

  • 4th - Whilst in Paris, Hitchcock is awarded a silver medal by Julien Tardieu in honour of the director's contribution to the film industry.
  • 12th - Whilst in Milan, Italy, to promote Psycho, Hitchcock is pictured sitting in a go-cart.
  • 29th - Hitchcock returns to New York from Europe.[437]

1961

January

  • Sensing that it had cinematic possibilities, Hitchcock instructs Paramount to try and secure the rights to Daphne du Maurier's short story The Birds. After nearly six month of negotiations, the rights are secured for $25,000.[438]

March

  • 14th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "The Horse Player", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

June

  • 25th - After months of negotiations, Hitchcock finally secures the film rights to Daphne du Maurier's short story The Birds for $25,000. [439]
  • The Hitchcocks spend the end of June in New York City with Alfred's sister Nellie and his cousin Teresa. They take in the latest shows and make a trip to Washington D.C.[440]

September

  • 16th - After a series of telephone conversations about developing a film from Daphne du Maurier's short story The Birds, novelist Evan Hunter flies from New York to Los Angeles to meet with Hitchcock.[441]

October

  • Hitchcock directs the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Bang! You're Dead".[442]
  • 13th - The Hitchcocks spot model Tippi Hedren in a television commercial.[443]
  • 17th - The Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode "Bang! You're Dead", directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.

November

  • 8th - Tippi Hedren takes part in a screen test with Martin Balsam. Hitchcock directs them both in scenes from Rebecca, Notorious and To Catch a Thief.[444]
  • 28th - Over dinner at Chasen's Restaurant with Alma and Lew Wasserman, Hitchcock offers Tippi Hedren the lead role in The Birds.[445]
  • 30th - Hitchcock sends Evan Hunter five pages of notes and amendments based on Hunter's second draft of The Birds screenplay.[446][447]

December

  • Hitchcock turns down the offer of a CBE (Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) in the Queen's New Year Honour's List for 1962.[448]
  • 14th - Evan Hunter sends Hitchcock 52 revised pages for the second draft of The Birds screenplay.[449]
  • 21st - Hitchcock sends Evan Hunter 4 further pages of notes based on the second draft of The Birds screenplay. He signs off by saying "I pray I'm not giving you too much to think about over the Christmas holidays... P.S. People are still asking, 'Why did the birds do it?'"[450]

1962

January

  • 4th - Returning from Christmas in St. Moritz, Hitchcock stops off in New York to discuss the screenplay of The Birds with Evan Hunter.[451]
  • 17th - Evan Hunter completes his final draft of The Birds screenplay. After telephone discussions with Hitchcock, a small number of further amendments are made.[451]

February

March

  • 19th - The Palace of Monaco makes a formal announcement that Princess Grace is intending to return to acting and will star in Hitchcock's adaptation of Marnie.[453][454]
  • 23rd - MGM president Joseph R. Vogel writes to Hitchcock claiming that Princess Grace is still under contract to the studio and that MGM would have to be a partner in the production of Marnie. Hitchcock rejects the claim.[455]

April

  • The French Government renounces the Administration and Mutual Assistance Convention treaty with Monaco in an attempt to reign in Monaco's reputation as a tax haven. The pressure on Monaco to negotiate a new treaty over the next few months means that Princess Grace will eventually abandon her plans to play the lead role in Hitchcock's Marnie.[456][457]
  • 2nd - Evan Hunter submits his final amendments to the screenplay for The Birds, including changes to the film's coda. Ultimately, Hitchcock decides not to use Hunter's ending.[458]
  • 18th - At the suggestion of Saul Bass, German electronic music composer Remi Gassmann writes to Hitchcock to extol the virtues of the tratonium instrument for creating film soundtracks. Hitchcock will go on to use the tratonium to create the soundtrack for The Birds.[459]
  • 24th - Concerned about the short gap between completing The Birds and the planned start date for Marnie of 1st August, Hitchcock announces that the latter will be delayed. He added that Princess Grace had agreed to the change.[460]

May

  • 2nd - The American Humane Association writes to Hitchcock with their concerns about the script of The Birds.[461]
  • 9th - Impressed by the demo tape of the tratonium, Hitchcock contracts Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala to provide a test soundtrack to the one of the bird attack sequences in The Birds.[462]

June

  • Paramount Pictures' screen rights to J.M. Barrie's play Mary Rose expire. Hitchcock eventually secures the rights in August 1963.[463]
  • 7th - The contentious sand dune scene in The Birds is filmed. Evan Hunter protests to Hitchcock against the addition of the scene without his knowledge.[464]

July

  • 2nd - François Truffaut writes to Hitchcock asking to be able to interview him over a period of several days in order to publish an in-depth book about his career.[465]

August

  • 13th - François Truffaut and translator Helen Scott begin interviewing Hitchcock at his Universal Studios office. Truffaut is shown a rough cut of The Birds during the morning and is invited to join the Hitchcocks to celebrate their birthdays with an evening meal at Perino's. Approximately 26 hours of interviews are eventually edited down to form Truffaut's book "Hitchcock", published in English in 1967.[466]
  • 19th - Hitchcock arrives into London for a week.[467]

September

  • 23rd - Playwright and novelist Patrick Hamilton, writer of the play Hitchcock's Rope was based on, dies aged 58.

October

  • 11th - The Alfred Hitchcock Hour episode "I Saw the Whole Thing", which was the only episode to be directed by Hitchcock, premiers on US TV.
  • Hitchcock completes his notes for The Birds soundtrack. After hearing the tratonium test, he decides the film's soundtrack should be entirely electronic sounds and natural sounds, with no traditional orchestration. Bernard Herrmann is contracted to act as the sound consultant for the film, with Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala recording the tratonium sounds in Germany.[468]

December

  • 14th - Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann leave Los Angeles to travel to Berlin to oversee the progress of Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala's electronic tratonium soundtrack for The Birds. En route, they lunch with Anny Ondra in Hamburg.[469]
  • 20th - Please with the progress made by Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala on the electronic score for The Birds, Hitchcock cables Peggy Robertson "WORK IN BERLIN COMPLETED TO MY SATISFACTION". Joined by his family, including his three granddaughters, the Hitchcocks then travel on to Paris and then St. Moritz for their Christmas vacation.[470]
  • 20th - Please with the progress made by Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala on the electronic score for The Birds, Hitchcock cables Peggy Robertson "WORK IN BERLIN COMPLETED TO MY SATISFACTION". Joined by his family, including his three granddaughters, the Hitchcocks then travel on to Paris and then St. Moritz for their Christmas vacation.[471]

1963

January

  • 6th - The Hitchcocks arrive back in New York after their Christmas vacation in St. Moritz.[472]
  • 8th - Hitchcock arrives back in Los Angeles.[472]
  • 11th - Peggy Robertson sends a memo detailing Hitchcock's requirements for The Birds end title card. The lack of a "THE END" title had proved to be contentious, with some preview audience members incorrectly assuming the film had broken down rather than ended.[472]

February

  • In a meeting with Universal's marketing executives, Hitchcock reveals his marketing slogan for The Birds — "Gentlemen, here is how we'll announce the movie. Are you ready? ... The Birds is coming!"[473]
  • 12th-14th - In preparation for the Museum of Modern Art's retrospective season of Hitchcock films, Peter Bogdanovich spends 3 days interviewing the director.[474]

March

  • 18th - Hitchcock addresses a luncheon of top Washington journalists at the National Press Club as part of the promotional buildup for The Birds premiere.[474]
  • 21st - The Birds premiere on the 27th at the Museum of Modern Art is cancelled. The museum's film curator Richard Giffith had grown increasingly uncomfortable that Universal was pushing for a red-carpet gala celebrity event and Hitchcock was concerned that the museum's facilities were substandard.[475]
  • 27th - With the Museum of Modern Art premiere cancelled, Hitchcock instead hosts a lavish dinner at "La Pavillon" on East 55th Street, New York. Afterwards, cocktails are served at the Four Seasons followed by a private screening of The Birds.[476]
  • 28th - The Birds is premiered at the Palace Theater on Broadway, New York, where Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren release 1,000 homing pigeons. A low-key press-only screening is held at the Museum of Modern Art.[477]

May

  • Cornish author Frank Baker writes to Hitchcock detailing similarities between Daphne du Maurier's short story and his own 1936 novel, also titled The Birds. Joseph Dubin, head of Universal Studios' legal department responds that "there is no actionable similarity between your work, the work of Miss du Maurier or the photoplay". Despite threatening to, Baker fails to take legal action.[478]
  • The Museum of Modern Art publishes Peter Bogdanovich's 48-page The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock as part of their Hitchcock film retrospective.[479]
  • 5th - Tippi Hedren, Alma and Alfred Hitchcock fly from Los Angeles to New York, en route to the Cannes Film Festival. They stay overnight at the Regis Hotel before flying on to Paris.[480]
  • 9th - The Hitchcocks and Tippi Hedren fly from Paris to Nice, before travelling on to Cannes. A evening cocktail reception is held in the ballroom of Les Ambassadeurs with 1,000 invited guests before the black-tie showing of The Birds at 9:30pm. Afterwards, a formal dinner is held at the Carlton Hotel for around 300 guests.[481]
  • 10th - Following a large press conference for The Birds, Hitchcock and Tippi Hedren release 400 pigeons.[481]
  • 13th - The Hitchcocks fly back to Paris from Nice, where they oversee the dubbing of The Birds trailer into various European languages.[482]
  • 16th - The Hitchcocks arrive back in Los Angeles.[482]

August

  • Hitchcock meets with Peggy Robertson to discuss the possibility of hiring Fay Compton to play a role in Mary Rose. Compton had played the role of Mary Rose in the original London stage production which Hitchcock saw in April 1920.[483]
  • 16th - Hitchcock sends a memo to his agent Herman Citron asking him to try and secure the rights to both J.M. Barrie's Mary Rose and John Buchan's The Three Hostages.[484]
  • 23rd - Agent Herman Citron writes a memo to Hitchcock to confirm that he can purchase the story rights to J.M. Barrie's play Mary Rose from Paramount Pictures.[485]

1964

March

  • Negotiations for Hitchcock's acquisition of the rights to J.M. Barrie's play Mary Rose are completed.[486]

April

  • 23rd - Hitchcock meets with François Truffaut in New York City to conduct follow-up questions for Truffaut's book "Hitchcock". Hitchcock also screens a print of Marnie for Truffaut.[487]

July

  • 5th - The BBC broadcasts an interview between Hitchcock and Huw Wheldon for the television series Monitor.[488]
  • Feeling unwell and tired, despite his recent European vacation, Hitchcock undergoes various medical tests but no underlying cause is found. He is advised to slow down his schedule and to diet.[489]

August

  • Hitchcock negotiates a new contract with Universal Studios. In return for transferring ownership of Shamley Productions and distribution rights to Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, Rope, Rear Window, The Trouble with Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much and Vertigo, the director becomes the 3rd largest shareholder in the studio.[490]

November

  • Hitchcock registers an original story idea with the Writers Guild, outlining a plot that prequels Shadow of a Doubt and follows an attractive serial killer who murders rich widows, drawing from the real-life English serial killers John George Haigh, John Christie and Neville Heath. Towards the end of November, he meets with author Robert Bloch and tries to persuade the novelist to develop an original idea based on the idea — Bloch eventually declines, partly due to the low salary offered.[491]
  • Hitchcock writes to Russian émigré novelist Vladimir Nabokov and tries to interest him in developing an original screenplay based on one of two stories that the director is considering as his next film — a crime caper about a family of Italian crooks or a gritty political spy thriller about a defecting scientist and his wife. Nabokov expresses interest in the first story, but is too busy to begin work until the summer of 1965 at the earliest.[492]

December

1965

January

  • 4th - Hitchcock meets with Italian writers Agenore Incrocci and Furio Scarpelli in Hollywood to discuss developing a script for the R.R.R.R. project. The project is eventually abandoned as Hitchcock decides to concentrate his energy on the pre-production of Torn Curtain.[494][495]

March

  • Hitchcock begins script meetings with writer Brian Moore to develop Torn Curtain.[496]
  • 7th - Hitchcock receives the Milestone Award at the Screen Producers Guild dinner ceremony. He begins his speech by saying, "They say that when a man drowns, his entire life flashes before his eyes. I am indeed fortunate, for I am having that same experience without even getting my feet wet."[497]

April

  • 3rd - Julie Andrews meets with Hitchcock for the first time to discuss her role in Torn Curtain.[498]

May

  • 25th - Brian Moore submits the first fifteen pages of his initial draft of Torn Curtain to Hitchcock.[499]

June

  • 22nd - Producer David O. Selznick, who brought Hitchcock to America, dies following a series of heart attacks, aged 63.

July

  • 9th - Hitchcock flies out to Europe to scout locations for Torn Curtain in Copenhagen and Frankfurt.[500]
  • 15th - Hitchcock returns to the US from scouting European locations for Torn Curtain.[501]
  • Hitchcock asks Brian Moore to make changes to his third draft of Torn Curtain towards the end of August, but the writer express his dissatisfaction with the entire project. Hitchcock begins looking around for a writer to replace Moore.[502]

September

  • 9th - Unhappy with the state of Brian Moore's screenplay for Torn Curtain, Hitchcock asks Peggy Robertson to draw up a list of skilled writers who might be able to salvage the script. Amongst the names, Robertson suggests John Michael Hayes. Unwilling to work with Hayes again, Hitchcock eventually selects the English writing team of Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall.[503]

October

  • 18th - The English writing team of Keith Waterhouse and Willis Hall arrive in Hollywood to work with Hitchcock on final script changes to Torn Curtain. Waterhouse and Hall will continuing working on the shooting script during filming.[504]

December

  • 16th - Playwright and novelist W. Somerset Maugham, writer of the novel "Ashenden" which Hitchcock adapted into Secret Agent, dies in Nice, France, aged 91.

1966

February

  • 15th - Writer James Allardice, who wrote Hitchcock's dialogue for Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour, as well as many of the director's speeches, dies of a heart attack aged 46.

March

  • Hitchcock listens to a recording of Bernard Herrmann's score for Torn Curtain. Rather than the upbeat score Hitchcock had asked for, and which the composer had promised to deliver, the score is typical Herrmann with heavy bass, brass and woodwind. Hitchcock immediately fires Herrmann and the two never talk to each other again.[505]

August

September

  • With Torn Curtain completed, the Hitchcocks go on a month-long vacation to Europe, visiting the Villa D'Este in Italy, Tel Aviv, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Munich and Paris.[507]

October

  • 22nd - British spy and double agent George Blake escapes from Wormwood Scrubs prison and flees to Russia. The story is later fictionalised by author Ronald Kirkbride and Hitchcock purchases the story rights with the intention of filming it as The Short Night.[508]

December

  • Together with Samuel A. Taylor and his wife, the Hitchcocks spend Christmas in St. Moritz. Hitchcock begins to plan his next project, the tale of a necrophiliac serial killer.[509]

1967

September

  • 13th - Hitchcock attends the opening night's performance of Eugene O'Neill's play "More Stately Mansion" in Los Angeles, which stars Ingrid Bergman. Afterwards, he joins Bergman at a post-event party.

1968

January

  • 18th - Hitchcock attends the funeral of his longtime physician, Dr. Ralph Tandowsky.[510]
  • 21st - Hitchcock meets with author Leon Uris to discuss developing a screenplay for Topaz.[510]

April

  • 10th - At the 40th Academic Awards, Hitchcock receives the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award from fellow director Robert Wise. Famously, his acceptance speech is just two words — "thank you".[511]
  • Hitchcock begins regular meetings with author Leon Uris to develop the screenplay for Topaz.[512]

May

  • 13th - Cinematographer Robert Burks, who worked with Hitchcock on 12 films in the 1950s and 1960s, dies with his wife in a house fire, aged 58.

June

  • Hitchcock's strained working partnership with author Leon Uris on the screenplay for Topaz comes to and end. Uris has only been able to complete a partial draft.[512]

July

  • Hitchcock hires playwright Herb Gardner to work on Topaz, but Gardner soon leaves after differences of opinion. With the start of filming looming, writer Samuel A. Taylor then becomes attached to the project.[512]
  • 10th - Hitchcock meets with Universal executives Edd Henry and Lew Wasserman to pitch Kaleidoscope as an alternative to making Topaz. During further meetings in the following days, Wasserman and Henry reject the proposal. Topaz in green lit with a budget of $4,000,000 — the largest budget of any Hitchcock film.[513]
  • 21st - Hitchcock travels to England with Herbert Coleman and Doc Erickson to scout locations for Topaz in Europe and to interview European actors. Whilst in Rome, Hitchcock shoots a screen test of Frederick Stafford at Cinecittà film studios.[512]

August

  • 2nd - Hitchcock arrives in Helsinki to scout for locations for his next project The Short Night. Over the next couple of days he visits Hämeenlinna, Aulanko and Vainikkala railway station, as well as giving interviews to the Finnish press.[514]
  • 5th - Hitchcock leaves Finland and travels to Denmark to shoot location footage for Topaz.[514]
  • Hitchcock returns to Los Angeles to finalise pre-production on Topaz.[512]

September

  • Hitchcock begins production on Topaz with European location filming, but without a completed script. Writer Samuel A. Taylor hastily works on the upcoming scenes.[512]
  • 4th - Variety announces that The Short Night will be Hitchcock's next film after Topaz.[515]

November

  • 18th - Producer Walter Wanger, who worked with Hitchcock on Foreign Correspondent, dies of a heart attack aged 74.

1969

April

  • Hitchcock returns to Paris in mid-April to film the duel finalé for Topaz. News that Alma has been hospitalised forces the director to return to Los Angeles before the sequence is completed and Herbert Coleman takes over. Two further endings will be filmed, with Hitchcock returning to Paris once more to film an ending at Orly Airport. The third "suicide" ending is constructed from existing footage.[512]

October

  • 3rd - Hitchcock is interviewed by Bryan Forbes in front of an audience at the National Film Theater in London.

December

  • 30th - BBC Television broadcasts Bryan Forbes' interview with Hitchcock, which was recorded at the National Film Theatre in October.
  • 30th - Hitchcock appears on the KYW-TV television show The Mike Douglas Show, alongside James Brown and Joan Rivers.[516]

1970

February

  • 14th - Cinematographer Harry Stradling, Sr., who worked with Hitchcock on Jamaica Inn, Mr. & Mrs. Smith and Suspicion, dies aged 68.

April

  • 6th - Hitchcock undergoes a thorough physical examination. He spends much of the year recuperating after the rigours of filming Topaz.[517]

June

  • 19th - BBC Television broadcasts an hour-long interview between Hitchcock and Bryan Forbes, recorded at the National Film Theatre in London.[518]

December

  • 10th - Hitchcock meets with Universal heads Lew Wasserman and Edd Henry to pitch Frenzy as his next project, based on Arthur La Bern's 1966 novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square. Wasserman and Henry agree, but with a budget cap of $2.8m.[519]
  • Hitchcock sends a copy of Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square to playwright Anthony Shaffer in New York, hoping to tempt him into writing the adaptation for Frenzy. Shaffer responds quickly to say that he "likes the story".[520]
  • 22nd - Universal Studios staff writer Estelle Conde provides Hitchcock with a 42 page synopsis of Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square. Conde's more concise 3 page précis of the novel's plot and main characters is delivered to Hitchcock on the 30th.[521]
  • 31st - Hitchcock telephones Anthony Shaffer on New Years Eve and the playwright agrees to write the screenplay for Frenzy.[520]

1971

January

  • Anthony Shaffer meets with the Hitchcocks in London to discuss Frenzy and to scout potential locations for the film.[522]
  • 14th - The French government makes Hitchcock a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour at a ceremony in Paris. The medal is awarded by Henri Langlois, co-founder of the Cinémathèque Français. Following the ceremony, the Hitchcocks return to America.[523]
  • 21st - Anthony Shaffer arrives in California to begin regular Frenzy script meetings with Hitchcock.[522]

February

  • 27th - Pleased with the progress so far, Hitchcock allows Anthony Shaffer to return to New York in order to complete the first-draft screenplay with dialogue for Frenzy.[524]
  • By late February, Anthony Shaffer and Hitchcock have produced a 55 page treatment for Frenzy, which drops several parts of Arthur La Bern's novel to help streamline the plot.[525]

March

  • With Anthony Shaffer working on the Frenzy screenplay in New York, Hitchcock storyboards key sequences for the film during March.[524]
  • 4th - Hitchcock receives the Academy Fellowship Award from the Society of Film and Television Arts during a ceremony at the Royal Albert Hall, London.
  • 15th - Hitchcock's friend Hume Cronyn writes to the director asking if he could be considered for a role in Frenzy. Hitchcock replies a few days later to Cronyn with a tactful letter saying that he doesn't think any of the bit-part roles would suit an actor of his stature. [526]
  • 17th - Hitchcock has a lunch meeting with actor Michael Caine to discuss the possibility of him playing the role of Bob Rusk, the serial killer in Frenzy. Caine will eventually decline the role.[527]
  • 31st - Hitchcock comes up with the "Mr. Rusk, you haven't got your tie on" ending for Frenzy.[528]

April

  • 9th - Hitchcock receives Anthony Shaffer's first draft of the Frenzy screenplay and spends the weekend reading it.[528]
  • 19th - Having flown in from New York, Anthony Shaffer meets with Hitchcock to discuss further revisions to the Frenzy screenplay. By now, the screenplay has become 160 pages long.[528]

May

  • 16th - Alma and Alfred Hitchcock arrive into London to begin production on Frenzy. As usual, they stay at Claridge's hotel in Mayfair.[527]
  • 16th - Hitchcock begins a series of meetings to gather together the cast and crew for Frenzy.[529]
  • 23rd - The Hitchcocks dine with Anthony Shaffer and his wife at their home on the Sunday evening. The following week will be spent discussing casting options for Frenzy.[530]
  • 26th - Actor John Longden, who starred in Blackmail and has smaller roles in 4 other Hitchcock films, dies aged 70.

June

  • 10th-16th - Following Alma's stroke, Hitchcock reschedules all his Frenzy cast and crew meetings to be held at Claridge's so that he can be close to his wife.[531]

July

  • 1st - Hitchcock meets with actor Jon Finch to interview him for the lead role of Richard Blaney in Frenzy.[532]
  • 6th - Hitchcock puts together a preliminary cast list for Frenzy. Amongst the actors who don't end up being cast in the film are Lynn Redgrave (Babs), Glenda Jackson (Mrs. Blaney) and Max Bygraves (Inspector Oxford)[533]
  • With the start of principal photography looming, Hitchcock increases the frequency of meetings and interviews for casting Frenzy. By the time the cameras start rolling on the 26th, only the role of Mrs. Blaney's secretary, Monica Barling, remains uncast.[533]
  • 30th - The first week of filming on Frenzy concludes with the long continuous tracking shot (lasting 75 seconds) of Rusk leading Babs through Covent Garden Market and back to his flat. Nine takes are required before Hitchcock is satisfied.[534]

August

  • 7th-8th - As Hitchcock is only able to film scenes at the Old Bailey at weekends, Richard Blaney's trail is rehearsed on the 7th and shot on the 8th.[535]
  • 14th - The Hitchcocks celebrate their 72nd birthdays with an evening meal at the Carriers Inn Restaurant in Cheshire.[536][537]
  • 28th - A Monday bank holiday means that the following week is a 4 day shoot, so the Hitchcocks spend a long weekend holidaying in Scotland.[538]

September

  • 14th - The Hitchcocks spend the evening dining with Princess Grace of Monaco and her husband, who are visiting London.[539]
  • 17th - Prince Rainier and Princess Grace of Monaco visit Hitchcock during location filming on Frenzy in Covent Garden Market.
  • 20th-24th - The 8th week of filming on Frenzy begins with Hitchcock feeling unwell, leading to some sequences to be shot by the assistant director, Colin M. Brewer. Sequences scheduled for the week include scenes at Scotland Yard, Chief Inspector Oxford pondering in the empty courtroom, Blaney's night at the Salvation Army and sequences at the Hilton Hotel. The week ends with Jon Finch being reprimanded for frequently arriving late on set each morning.[540]
  • 27th-30th - The 9th week of filming on Frenzy again sees Hitchcock suffering from a sore throat. More sequences are filmed at the Coburg Hotel, at the prison (Wormwood Scrubs), Rusk carrying the body of Babs to the potato truck, and for the opening sequence.[541]

October

  • 26th - Hitchcock leaves London to return to America aboard TWA flight #761.[542]
  • 29th - Now back in America and reunited with Alma, Hitchcock sends the following memo to Universal Studios: "Principal photography has been completed on FRENZY"[542]

November

  • 10th - Hitchcock's trusted assistant Peggy Robertson leaves London to fly back to Los Angeles. Also safely stowed on the plane are the camera negatives of Frenzy.[543]
  • 11th - Hitchcock begins work with editor John Jympson to create a work print of Frenzy that can be sent to composer Henry Mancini. Whilst overseeing the editing, Hitchcock begins conducts several interviews with journalists and film critics.[544]
  • 29th - Editor John Jympson flies out to London with the film to prepare for the recording sessions with Henry Mancini. Hitchcock has supplied him with copious notes on further refinements to both the film and it's soundtrack.[545]

December

  • 14th - Hitchcock arrives in London, accompanied by Alma, to attend the remainder of Henry Mancini's Frenzy recording sessions. After hearing the completed score, Hitchcock decides to reject it and subsequently hires Ron Goodwin to compose a new one. As usual, Hitchcock, who hated confrontations of any kind, asks a studio executive to convey the news to Mancini.[546]
  • 14th - Hitchcock arrives in London, accompanied by Alma, to attend the remainder of Henry Mancini's Frenzy recording sessions. After hearing the completed score, Hitchcock decides to reject it and subsequently hires Ron Goodwin to compose a new one. As usual, Hitchcock, who hated confrontations of any kind, asks a studio executive to convey the news to Mancini.[546]
  • 17th - The Hitchcocks fly out of London to spend the rest of December holidaying in Marrakech.[547]

1972

January

  • 1st - The Hitchcocks return to London from their Christmas holidays in Marrakesh to continue post-production work on Frenzy.[547]
  • 3rd - Hitchcock films portions of the trailer for Frenzy at London County Hall. Stuntwoman Roberta Gibbs plays the role of the corpse in the River Thames.[548]
  • 15th - The Hitchcocks leave London for New York.[547]
  • 19th - The Hitchcocks arrive back in Los Angeles after visiting New York.[547]

April

  • 27th - Hitchcock attends a film class at the University of South California, held by Professor Arthur Knight. The director screens Frenzy for the students.[549]

May

  • 6th - The Hitchcocks leave Los Angeles for the Cannes Film Festival in France. They board the cruise liner Michelangelo in New York. During the voyage, several Hitchcock films are screened for the passengers, including Frenzy.[550]
  • 15th - The Hitchcocks arrive in Cannes and stay at the Carlton Hotel.[550]
  • 19th - Frenzy is shown at the Cannes Film Festival and Hitchcock receives a standing ovation from the audience.[550]
  • 20th - The Hitchcocks spend a day in Monaco with Princess Grace and her husband.[551]
  • 21st - The Hitchcocks arrive in London, ahead of the UK press screenings and London premier of Frenzy.[551]
  • 29th - In a letter to the editor published in The Times, author Arthur La Bern voices his disapproval of how his 1966 novel Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square was adapted into Frenzy by Hitchcock and Anthony Shaffer.[552]

June

  • 2nd - The Hitchcocks spend a night in Paris before flying back to New York the following day.[551]
  • 6th - Hitchcock is awarded an honourary degree from Columbia University.[553][554]
  • 8th - ABC broadcasts a 65-minute interview between Hitchcock and Dick Cavett.[555]
  • 12th - Hitchcock appears on the Mike Douglas Show.[556]

July

  • 16th - The first part of a two-part interview with Hitchcock, conducted by Pia Lindström, is broadcast on CBS as part of their Camera Three series.[557]
  • 23rd - The concluding part of a two-part interview with Hitchcock, conducted by William K. Everson, is broadcast on CBS as part of their Camera Three series.[557]

August

  • 18th - Hitchcock is interviewed during the AFI's Center for Advanced Film Studies' University Advisory Committee Seminar. When asked what he likes to do to cinema audiences, he responds, "Give them pleasure, the same pleasure they have when they wake up from a nightmare."[558]

September

  • The Hitchcocks spend September and October touring Europe to promote Frenzy.[559]

November

1973

January

  • Hitchcock spends two weeks in hospital recovering from gout.[560]

May

  • 29th - Hitchcock appears on NBC's Tomorrow show where he is interviewed by Tom Snyder.[561]

June

  • Hitchcock attends the funeral of Dave Chasen, owner of Chasen's Restaurant.[560]

August

  • A minor heart scare sees Hitchcock confined to bed.[560]

September

  • Hitchcock begins working with Ernest Lehman on Deceit (later to be retitled Family Plot).[560]

1974

April

  • 29th - The Film Society of Lincoln Center, New York, hold a gala tribute to Hitchcock. In his address, the director ends by saying "They tell me that a murder is committed every minute, so I don't want to waste any more of your time. I know you want to get to work. Thank you."[562][563]

August

  • The Hitchcocks celebrate their 75th birthdays at a special party organised by Lew Wasserman at Chasen's Restaurant. Among the guests are Cary Grant, Laraine Day, Paul Newman and François Truffaut.[562]

September

  • Hitchcock suffers a heart attack and is fitted with a pacemaker at the UCLA hospital.[564]

October

  • Ill health continues to dog Hitchcock — fever, colitis, kidney stones, arthritis and the first of several falls. Work on Deceit is put on hold whilst the director recovers.[564]

1975

January

  • Having recovered from his bout of ill health in 1974, Hitchcock begins gathering the crew and selecting the cast for Family Plot (at that point still titled Alfred Hitchcock's Deceit).[565]

February

  • Hitchcock meets with actress Karen Black and casts her as the wife of the villain in Family Plot.[566]

April

  • After months of discussion and occasional disagreements with Hitchcock, Ernest Lehman finalises his screenplay for Deceit.[567]

May

  • 12th - Hitchcock begins filming his 53rd film, Alfred Hitchcock's Deceit — which is retitled Family Plot in July.[568][569]

June

July

  • 9th - Variety lists Hitchcock's latest production as being titled Family Plot.

November

  • Universal's music executive Harry Garfield recommends composer John Williams to Hitchcock after the director rejects the studios suggestion of Henry Mancini, who had written the rejected score to Frenzy (1972). Williams first seeks approval from his friend Bernard Herrman and then spends several weeks meeting with Hitchcock over lunch to discuss the score and classical music in general.[572]

December

  • 24th - Composer Bernard Herrmann, who created many of the most iconic Hitchcock film scores, dies in his sleep after completing the recording sessions for Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver in New York.
  • With Family Plot nearly complete, the Hitchcocks make their final trip to Europe and spend Christmas at the Palace Hotel in St. Moritz.[573]

1976

January

  • 12th-14th - Composer John Williams spends 3 days recording his score for Family Plot. Hitchcock, apparently unwell after returning from St. Moritz, briefly attends one of the sessions.[572]

March

  • 21st - Hitchcock's 53rd film Family Plot is premiered at Filmex, the Los Angeles International Film Festival.[574]
  • 23rd - Hitchcock takes part in a large press conference to promote his 53rd film, Family Plot.[575]

June

  • 12th - Director Frank Capra presents Hitchcock with an award at the "Entertainment '76" event in Hollywood.

July

  • 1st - The New York Times reports that the French Consul General, Michel Rouganeau, presented Hitchcock with papers naming him "a commander of the French Order of National Arts and Letters" at a quiet ceremony in Hollywood. The article goes on to say, "Mr. Hitchcock said he was an unabashed francophile. He has a high regard for France, for French culture and particularly French food."[576]

August

  • 20th - Actress Phyllis Konstam, who appeared in four of Hitchcock's early films, dies of a heart attack, aged 69.

November

  • 7th - As part of a season celebrating the 50th anniversary of Elstree Studios, BBC Television broadcasts Blackmail (1929) with a specially recorded introduction by Hitchcock.[577]

1977

January

  • 8th - Charles Frend, who edited four of Hitchcock's films in the 1930s, dies aged 67.

February

  • The press announce that The Short Night will become Hitchcock's 54th film.[578][579]

May

  • Hitchcock begins working with writer James Costigan on the pre-prodcution of The Short Night, the director's 54th film. Finding it difficult to work with Costigan, Hitchcock soon ends the partnership.[580]

July

October

  • Ernest Lehman begins helping Hitchcock on the pre-prodcution of The Short Night.[581]
  • 17th - Film producer Michael Balcon, who gave Hitchcock the chance to direct his first feature film and then later signed him to Gaumont-British, dies aged 81.

November

  • Grace Kelly visits the Hitchcocks.[582]

1978

February

  • Grace Kelly visits the Hitchcocks.[583]

July

  • Norman Lloyd begins helping Hitchcock on the pre-prodcution of The Short Night.[584]

October

December

  • Writer David Freeman begins working with Hitchcock on the script of The Short Night.[587]

1979

January

  • 4th - New York's WNYC radio station broadcasts an interview with Hitchcock as part of their "International Literary Report" series.[588]
  • 30th - Hitchcock's older sister Ellen Kathleen dies.[589]

March

  • 7th - Hitchcock receives the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award at a star-studded ceremony hosted by Ingrid Bergman. Due to concerns about his health, Hitchcock pre-records his acceptance speech in the afternoon and this footage is spliced together with the evening's speech into the final TV broadcast version.[590]

May

  • 8th - Hitchcock's old friend Victor Saville, who had recently attended the director's AFI Lifetime Achievement Award, dies. Several sources regard Saville's death as a contributing factor to Hitchcock deciding to abandon any attempt to make The Short Night and to shut down his bungalow office at Universal.[591]

September

  • Ingrid Bergman pays Hitchcock a final visit — "He took both my hands and tears streamed down his face and he said, 'Ingrid, I'm going to die,' and I said, 'But of course you are going to die sometime, Hitch ... we are all going to die.' And then I told him that I, too, had recently been very ill, and that I had thought about it, too. And for a moment the logic of that seemed to make him more peaceful."[592]

1980

April

  • With his health failing in early April, Hitchcock takes to bed at his Bel Air home.[593]
  • 29th - Alfred Hitchcock dies of renal failure at 9:17am at his Bel Air home.
  • Hitchcock checks into Cedars of Lebanon hospital for diagnostic tests.[594][595]

June

  • 29th - In an article published in the Boston Globe, composer John Williams spoke about working with Hitchcock on Family Plot (1976), "I wasn't excited about that particular picture, but I wanted to work with Hitchcock, and it turned out to be his last film. He didn't want any thick, heavy scoring. 'Just remember this,' he said to me, 'murder can be fun.'"[596]

1982

May

  • 5th - Actor John Williams, who appeared in three Hitchcock films and several of the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episodes he directed, dies aged 80.

July

1984

November

  • 5th - Ivor Montagu, who edited three of Hitchcock's earliest films and acted as a producer on four more, dies aged 80.

1985

September

  • 4th - Actress Isabel Jeans, who appeared in three Hitchcock films, dies aged 93.

1986

September

October

  • 3rd - BBC Television broadcasts the second part of a two-part "Omnibus" documentary about Hitchcock titled "Sex, Murder and Mayhem".[599]

1987

April

  • 13th - Francis M. Cockrell, who wrote 20 episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents including several directed by Hitchcock, dies aged 80.

November

  • 20th - Helen Scott, who acted as the translator during François Truffaut's interviews with Hitchcock, dies aged 72.

1989

May

  • 13th - Novelist Daphne du Maurier, whose works were adapted into the Hitchcock films Jamaica Inn, Rebecca and The Birds, dies aged 81.

1990

April

  • 17th - Production designer and art director J. McMillan Johnson, who worked on three Hitchcock films including Rear Window and To Catch a Thief, dies aged 77.

1991

December

  • 6th - Rodney Ackland, who worked with Hitchcock on The Skin Game (1931) and Number Seventeen (1932), dies aged 83.

1993

March

1994

August

  • 14th - Producer and screenwriter Joan Harrison, who entered the film industry as Hitchcock's secretary in 1933, dies at the age of 87.
  • Actor Barry Foster unveils a ceremonial plaque at the former site of 517 The High Road, Leytonstone, to commemorate Hitchcock's birthplace.

1995

September

1997

October

  • 29th - Actress Janet Leigh unveils a new 32 cent stamp featuring Hitchcock as part of their "Legends of Hollywood" series. The stamp is eventually released in August 1998.[602]

1998

August

  • 3rd - The United States Postal Service releases a 32 cent stamp featuring Hitchcock as part of their "Legends of Hollywood" series. The design had been unveiled by Janet Leigh in October 1997.[603]

2007

February

March

  • 1st - Production designer and art director Harold Michelson, who worked with Hitchcock on The Birds and Marnie, dies aged 87.

July

  • 23rd - Hungarian writer George Tabori, who worked with Hitchcock on I Confess, dies aged 93.

November

  • 4th - Author and screenwriter Peter Viertel, who worked with Hitchcock on Saboteur, dies aged 86.
  • 6th - Sound recordist Peter Handford, who worked with Hitchcock on Under Capricorn and Frenzy, dies aged 88.

2008

January

  • 31st - Cinematographer Bryan Langley, who worked with Hitchcock on 4 films, including Number Seventeen, dies.

2012

August

2013

August

  • 23rd - Cinematographer Gilbert Taylor, who worked with Hitchcock on Number Seventeen and Frenzy, dies aged 99.[604]

October

  • 2nd - Film producer and assistant director Hilton A. Green, who worked with Hitchcock on Psycho and Marnie, dies aged 84.

References

  1. Telephone Directories
  2. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 21
  3. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 24.
  4. St. Ignatius College: History of the School
  5. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 25
  6. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 25
  7. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 27
  8. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 27
  9. See Find a Grave.
  10. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 31
  11. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 32-34
  12. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 50
  13. London's Hollywood: The Gainsborough Studio in the Silent Years (2014) by Gary Chapman, chapter 3.
  14. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 35-36
  15. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 39-40
  16. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 40-43
  17. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 44-45
  18. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 54
  19. London's Hollywood: The Gainsborough Studio in the Silent Years (2014) by Gary Chapman
  20. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 66
  21. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 62
  22. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 69
  23. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 78
  24. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 70
  25. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 70
  26. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 71
  27. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 74
  28. Hitchcock Annual (1998) - Hitchcock's "The Mountain Eagle"
  29. Daily Mail (24/Feb/1926) - New British Films
  30. Daily Mail (26/Feb/1926) - Thames "Murder" Film
  31. The Observer (14/Apr/1926) - The Pleasure Garden
  32. Western Morning News (29/May/1926) - A Great British Producer
  33. Dundee Courier (08/Jun/1926) - New Scottish Film
  34. Nottingham Evening Post (15/Sep/1926) - New British Film: Ivor Novello in ''The Lodger''
  35. Aberdeen Journal (20/Oct/1926) - Rescuing the Films for Britain
  36. Brompton Oratory's official web site
  37. Wikipedia: Brompton Oratory
  38. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 89
  39. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 92
  40. http://www.badruttspalace.com
  41. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 89
  42. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 89-90
  43. The Times (12/Jan/1927) - The Film World
  44. Alfred Hitchcock's London: A Reference Guide to Locations (2009) by Gary Giblin, page 93-94
  45. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 92
  46. Daily Mail (31/Mar/1927) - Film-Making Problems
  47. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 93
  48. Daily Mail (02/Jun/1927) - The Farmer's Wife
  49. Alfred Hitchcock's London: A Reference Guide to Locations (2009) by Gary Giblin, page 257
  50. Daily Mail (08/Jun/1927) - New British Films: The Vortex and Easy Virtue
  51. The Guardian (11/Jun/1927) - THE WEEK ON SCREEN: Britain's Baby
  52. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 96
  53. The Times (12/Oct/1927) - New British Film
  54. Daily Mail (15/Oct/1927) - Miss Betty Balfour.
  55. Some newspapers report Hitchcock was only 16 when he started working in films! See Nottingham Evening Post (15/Nov/1927) - £300 a Week for Young Man, The News (Adelaide) (15/Nov/1927) - Clerk to director, The West Australian (17/Dec/1927) - The Kinema and Western Mail (Perth) (29/Dec/1927) - Film Flickers
  56. The Times (07/Dec/1927) - The Film World
  57. The Times (18/Jan/1928) - The Film World
  58. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 103
  59. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 105
  60. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 112
  61. The Times (07/Nov/1928) - The Film World
  62. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 117
  63. The Times (13/Mar/1929) - The Film World: Through unknown Australia
  64. The Times (14/May/1929) - The Duke and Duchess of York: Visit to film studios
  65. Nottingham Evening Post (23/May/1929) - Filming the British Museum
  66. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 125/7
  67. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 132
  68. Hull Daily Mail (06/Aug/1930).
  69. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 139
  70. As reported in the Perth Western Mail
  71. The Times (21/Jan/1931) - The film world
  72. The Times (04/Nov/1931) - The film world
  73. The Times (16/Nov/1931) - Marriages: Mr H W Austin and Miss Phyllis Konstam
  74. See passenger list.
  75. The Times (04/Apr/1932) - New films in London
  76. The Times (11/Aug/1932) - New British films
  77. Variety (1932) - Times Square: Chatter - London (Nov 15th)
  78. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 153
  79. The Times (04/Jan/1933) - New British films
  80. The Times (01/Feb/1933) - British Film Production: Bulldog Drummond
  81. Gloucestershire Echo (26/Apr/1933) - Language in Pictures
  82. Western Morning News (29/Apr/1933)
  83. Wikipedia: Alfred Thomson
  84. The Times (09/Nov/1933) - New British films
  85. Variety (1933) - Hitchcock Signed
  86. The Times (15/Feb/1934) - New film studios at Hammersmith
  87. The Times (05/Mar/1934) - New films in London: Waltzes from Vienna
  88. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 141
  89. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 170
  90. The Times (10/Dec/1934) - New films in London: The Man Who Knew Too Much
  91. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 168
  92. Variety (1935) - Times Square: Chatter - London (Feb 12th)
  93. For example, see Motion Picture Daily (21/Mar/1935) - English Firm Will Produce With 1st Div.
  94. Yorkshire Post (06/Aug/1935)
  95. IMDB: Mary Field
  96. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 184
  97. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 190
  98. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 193
  99. Radio listings in the Gloucestershire Echo (04/Mar/1937).
  100. See passenger list.
  101. Source: Radio Daily (27/Aug/1937)
  102. Variety (01/Aug/1937).
  103. Variety (08/Sep/1937)
  104. Wikipedia: MV Georgic
  105. See passenger list.
  106. Yorkshire Post (24/Jan/1938)
  107. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  108. The Manchester Guardian (04/04/1938) - Big Prices at an Art Exhibition
  109. Wikipedia: Christopher Wood (English painter)
  110. Aberdeen Journal (20/Apr/1938) - Work on New Film Held Up
  111. The Times (30/May/1938) - Empire Amateur Film Festival
  112. Aberdeen Journal (30/May/1938) - Empire Amateur Films
  113. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 213-4
  114. See passenger list.
  115. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 214
  116. Variety (1938) - Hitchcock's Selznick Palaver Cold, He's Now Dickering With 20th
  117. Variety (1938) - Hitchcock's Selznick Palaver Cold, He's Now Dickering With 20th
  118. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 215
  119. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 216
  120. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 218
  121. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 219
  122. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 220
  123. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 221
  124. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 221
  125. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 221
  126. Variety (13/Jul/1938)
  127. New York Times (17/Jul/1938) - 'Hitch' in His Plans
  128. See passenger list.
  129. Variety (1938) - Pictures: Hitchcock Draws 'Becky' as Second for Selznick
  130. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 229
  131. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 230
  132. New York Times (09/Jan/1939) & (12/Feb/1939)
  133. New York Times (09/Jan/1939) & (12/Feb/1939)
  134. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 330
  135. See passenger list.
  136. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 234
  137. The aircraft was recorded as NC 822-M and was piloted by Addison G. Person.
  138. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 234
  139. The Yale Book of Quotations (2006) edited by Fred R. Shapiro
  140. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 234
  141. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 234
  142. Radio listing in the San Antonio Express (13/Apr/1939)
  143. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 237
  144. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 238
  145. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 240
  146. New York Times (18/Jun/1939)
  147. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 241-2
  148. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 248
  149. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 245
  150. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 253
  151. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 255-6
  152. Wikpedia: Neutrality Acts of 1930s
  153. "Tennis Matches to Aid British War Relief Fund" in Los Angeles Times (21/Apr/1940)
  154. "Bette Davis Acclaimed by Throng" in Los Angeles Times (14/Jun/1940)
  155. Variety (03/Jul/1940) - L.A. to N.Y.
  156. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 275-6
  157. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 276
  158. "Alfred Hitchcock found contentment in SV" by Marion Dale Pokriots (Scotts Valley Historical Society)
  159. Variety (04/Sep/1940) - N.Y. to L.A.
  160. "Palladium Will Open to Halloween Throngs" in Los Angeles Times (27/Oct/1940)
  161. As reported in several U.S. local newspapers, e.g. Ogden Standard Examiner (13/Dec/1940) and TIME (23/Dec/1940).
  162. "Top 1940 Stars and Pix" in Variety (18/Dec/1940)
  163. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 285
  164. Variety (1941) - Pictures: Studes Get Their Film Knowledge From Experts
  165. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 281-82
  166. Variety (28/05/1941) - L.A. to N.Y.
  167. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 288-89
  168. Variety (02/07/1941) - L.A. to N.Y.
  169. Memo from George Schaefer (Jun/1941)
  170. Letter from Samson Raphaelson (28/Jun/1941)
  171. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 289-90
  172. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 293
  173. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 294
  174. Variety (1941) - Chatter: Hollywood (Aug 27th)
  175. American Cinematographer (1993) - Saboteur: Hitchcock Set Free
  176. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 301
  177. New York Times (27/Nov/1941) - L.A. to N.Y.
  178. Variety (03/Dec/1941) - L.A. to N.Y.
  179. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 294
  180. American Cinematographer (1993) - Saboteur: Hitchcock Set Free
  181. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 304
  182. American Cinematographer (1993) - Saboteur: Hitchcock Set Free
  183. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 303
  184. Wikipedia: SS Normandie
  185. The cut SS Normandie scene was restored for the film's 1948 post-war re-release.
  186. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 307
  187. Wikipedia: Brown Derby
  188. Uncle Charlie by Gordon McDonell (05/May/1942)
  189. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 308
  190. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 308
  191. American Cinematographer (1993) - Hitchcock's Mastery is Beyond Doubt in Shadow
  192. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 311-12
  193. The "S" stands for producer Jack H. Skirball. American Cinematographer (1993) - Hitchcock's Mastery is Beyond Doubt in Shadow
  194. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 317
  195. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 312
  196. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 316-17
  197. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 314
  198. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 318
  199. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 325
  200. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 322-23
  201. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 324
  202. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 328
  203. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 328
  204. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 325-26
  205. The Alfred Hitchcock Presents Companion (2001) by Martin Grams Jnr & Patrik Wikstrom, pages 14-15
  206. Radio listing in the New York Times (24/Jan/1943). The Alfred Hitchcock Story (1999) by Ken Mogg, page 93.
  207. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 330
  208. "Hedda Hopper Looking at Hollywood" in Los Angeles Times (16/Apr/1943).
  209. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 345
  210. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 346
  211. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 343
  212. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 269
  213. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 348
  214. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 272
  215. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 348
  216. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 272
  217. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 348
  218. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 283
  219. Hitchcock is listed on the Aquitania passenger list, along with a handwritten note "R.A.F. allied forces under orders". The dangers of Atlantic travel meant that both Sidney Bernstein and Alma Reville were listed as people to be contacted in the event of Hitch's death if the Aquitania was sunk.
  220. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 353
  221. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 273
  222. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 356
  223. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 361.
  224. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 367.
  225. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 361-63.
  226. Spoto gives different dates, claiming Dalí arrived in Hollywood in September and the sequences were filmed in October.
  227. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 276
  228. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 283
  229. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 278
  230. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 278
  231. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 367.
  232. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 279
  233. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 363-64
  234. Hitchcock Annual (1996) - The unknown Hitchcock: Watchtower over Tomorrow
  235. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 368.
  236. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 286
  237. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 285
  238. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 285
  239. Radio listings in the New York Times (17/Feb/1946).
  240. See, for example, Fresno Bee Republican (24/Feb/1946).
  241. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 294
  242. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 284
  243. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 295
  244. The ticket was booked in London on 24th May and paid for by Vanguard Films.
  245. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 297
  246. See, for example, the San Antonio Light (18/Aug/1946).
  247. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 297
  248. Radio listing in the Hull Daily Mail (06/Dec/1946).
  249. For example, Radio Daily (18/Dec/1946) reported "From 9:30 to 10 p.m., network will air Ben Hecht's play 'Miracle of a Bum' which will feature the author and be narrated by Alfred Hitchcock." Other sources include the radio listings in the Anniston Star (24/Dec/1946).
  250. See, for example, "Hitchcock's Head Swells When Puppy Nip Ear" in the Salt Lake Tribune (01/Feb/1947).
  251. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 405
  252. Wikipedia: Hollywood blacklist
  253. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 414
  254. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 411
  255. American Cinematographer (1985) - Rope - Something Different
  256. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 415
  257. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 415
  258. The Alfred Hitchcock Story (1999) by Ken Mogg, page 93
  259. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 415 & 418
  260. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 419. "Hedda Hopper" column in Los Angeles Times (04/Jun/1948) states that Hitchcock would return to Hollywood on Monday 7th to work on the Rope trailer for a week before returning to London.
  261. The Stage (1948) - Round About
  262. See this press photo.
  263. British Kinematography (1948) - Lecture Programme: September, 1948
  264. British Kinematography (1948) - Lecture Programme: Autumn, 1948
  265. British Kinematography (1949) - Film Production Technique
  266. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 428
  267. Hitchcock Gallery: 23/Oct/1948
  268. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 428
  269. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 428-29
  270. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 429
  271. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 429
  272. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 429
  273. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 430
  274. Radio: Mr and Mrs Smith (Screen Directors' Playhouse, 30/Jan/1949)
  275. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 433
  276. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 431
  277. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 431-32
  278. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 432
  279. See passenger list.
  280. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 433
  281. See passenger list.
  282. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 445
  283. "Sol Lesser Tells Plans for Quartet of Films, Buys 'Black Chiffon'" in Los Angeles Times (31/Aug/1950)
  284. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 446
  285. Radio listing from the New York Times (10/Sep/1950).
  286. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 446-49
  287. Radio: Lifeboat (Screen Directors' Playhouse, 16/Nov/1950)
  288. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 453
  289. Radio: Spellbound (Screen Directors' Playhouse, 25/Jan/1951)
  290. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 454
  291. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 454-55
  292. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 455
  293. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 14-15
  294. Focus on Hollywood (BBC Radio, 29/Oct/1951)
  295. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 334
  296. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 334
  297. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 334
  298. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 336
  299. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 457-58
  300. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 457
  301. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 337-8
  302. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 459
  303. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 338
  304. "Stage Producers Help Cowan Cast His Film" in Los Angeles Times (10/Sep/1952)
  305. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 463
  306. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 341
  307. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 6
  308. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 468
  309. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 483-85
  310. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 345
  311. American Cinematographer (1990) - Hitchcock's Techniques Tell Rear Window Story
  312. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 43
  313. American Cinematographer (1990) - Hitchcock's Techniques Tell Rear Window Story
  314. Patrick McGilligan states filming began in October, but this is likely an error.
  315. "Fred Zinnemann wins Directors' Guild Award" in Los Angeles Times (25/Jan/1954)
  316. "Los Angeles Times" in Los Angeles Times (07/Feb/1954)
  317. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 46
  318. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 92
  319. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 97-98
  320. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 102
  321. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 493
  322. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 128-29
  323. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 351
  324. See passenger list.
  325. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 351
  326. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 105
  327. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 351
  328. "Hitchcock and France: The Forging of an Auteur" - by James M. Vest (2003), page 59
  329. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 134-35
  330. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 118
  331. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 119-21
  332. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 354
  333. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 121 & 138
  334. What's My Line (12/Sep/1954)
  335. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, pages 138-39
  336. "Hitchcock and France: The Forging of an Auteur" - by James M. Vest (2003), pages 84-87
  337. "Camera Drops, Hits Hitchcock" in Los Angeles Times (14/Oct/1954). However, Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 143, says the accident happened on the 12th.
  338. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 143
  339. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 355
  340. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 356
  341. Yorkshire Post and Leeds Mercury (14/Dec/1954)
  342. Hitchcock and France: The Forging of an Auteur (2003) by James M. Vest, page 93-94
  343. Hitchcock and France: The Forging of an Auteur (2003) by James M. Vest, page 93-94
  344. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 507
  345. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 359
  346. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 509-10
  347. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 510
  348. Close-Up of Alfred Hitchcock (BBC Radio, 03/Apr/1955)
  349. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  350. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 362
  351. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 362
  352. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, chapter 13
  353. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 362
  354. Alfred Hitchcock's London: A Reference Guide to Locations (2009) by Gary Giblin, pages 174-77
  355. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 368
  356. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 373
  357. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 376
  358. See passenger list.
  359. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 373
  360. Stars and Stripes Newspaper (06/Dec/1955) - Alfred Hitchcock 'Vanishes'
  361. Wikipedia: Loke Wan Tho
  362. See Articles about Hitchcock's disappearance in December 1955 for further details and newspaper reports.
  363. The airplane number was recorded as 1024V and the Captain was W. Carlton with 1st Officer D. Frost.
  364. The airplane number was recorded as 1026V.
  365. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 376-7
  366. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 373
  367. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 377
  368. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 377
  369. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 377
  370. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 378
  371. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 378
  372. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 380-1
  373. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 379
  374. See passenger list.
  375. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 380-1
  376. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 382
  377. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 383
  378. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 383
  379. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page384
  380. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 384
  381. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page381
  382. The hospital is now the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Wikipedia)
  383. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 545
  384. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page384
  385. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 545
  386. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page385
  387. The hospital is now the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Wikipedia)
  388. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 546
  389. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 546
  390. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 546
  391. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 547
  392. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 551
  393. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 206
  394. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 552
  395. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 551
  396. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page381
  397. The Alfred Hitchcock Presents Companion (2001) by Martin Grams Jnr & Patrik Wikstrom states Hitchcock directed the episode on September 30th, but that was the date of broadcast
  398. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 391
  399. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 553
  400. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 553
  401. Document: Letter from Otis L. Guernsey (14/Oct/1957)
  402. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 555
  403. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 555
  404. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 556
  405. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 556
  406. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 557
  407. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 557
  408. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 557
  409. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 403
  410. Vertigo: The Making of a Hitchcock Classic (1998) by Dan Auiler, page 143
  411. Vertigo: The Making of a Hitchcock Classic (1998) by Dan Auiler, pages 143-44
  412. Daily Mail (09/Jun/1958) - Fifty angry men seek the film hoaxer
  413. Source: Motion Picture Daily (22/Dec/1958)
  414. Source: Motion Picture Daily (23/Dec/1958)
  415. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 408
  416. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 409
  417. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 409
  418. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, pages 411-2
  419. Source: Motion Picture Daily (15/Jun/1959)
  420. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 415
  421. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 417
  422. Motion Picture Daily (02/Oct/1959).
  423. Motion Picture Daily (23/Oct/1959).
  424. There Really Was a Hollywood (1984) by Janet Leigh
  425. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 444
  426. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 444
  427. Motion Picture Daily (04/Apr/1960) reported that Hitchcock departed from California during the weekend of 2nd April
  428. The Dark Side of Genius: The Life of Alfred Hitchcock (1983) by Donald Spoto, page 444
  429. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 24 & 28
  430. Source: Motion Picture Daily (28/Apr/1960)
  431. Source: Motion Picture Daily (07/Jun/1960)
  432. Source: Motion Picture Daily (16/Jun/1960)
  433. Source: Motion Picture Daily (16/Jun/1960)
  434. Source: Motion Picture Daily (16/Jun/1960)
  435. Source: Motion Picture Daily (21/Jun/1960)
  436. Interview: Picture Parade (BBC, 05/Jun/1960)
  437. Source: Motion Picture Daily (28/Oct/1960)
  438. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 26-27
  439. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 26-27
  440. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan
  441. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 36-37
  442. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan
  443. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 215
  444. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 62
  445. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 63
  446. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 45-46
  447. Sight and Sound (1997) - Me and Hitch
  448. The Guardian: Some who turned the offer down
  449. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 46
  450. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 46-48
  451. 451.0 451.1 The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 49
  452. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 109
  453. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 10
  454. Milwaukee Sentinel (19/Mar/1962) - Hitch Scoop 'Em, Signs Grace
  455. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 11
  456. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 13-14.
  457. Save Hitchcock: The Truth why Grace of Monaco didn't play Marnie
  458. Sight and Sound (1997) - Me and Hitch
  459. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 157-58
  460. The Times (24/Apr/1962) - Princess Grace film delayed
  461. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 182
  462. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 159
  463. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 207
  464. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 147-48
  465. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 631
  466. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 633
  467. Radio-Television Daily (17/Aug/1962)
  468. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 160-61
  469. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 164
  470. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 166
  471. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 166
  472. 472.0 472.1 472.2 The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 166
  473. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 184-85
  474. 474.0 474.1 The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 188
  475. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 188-93
  476. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 194
  477. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 194-95
  478. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 32
  479. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 195-96
  480. The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, pages 196-97
  481. 481.0 481.1 The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 197
  482. 482.0 482.1 The Making of Hitchcock's The Birds (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 198
  483. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2005) by Tony Lee Moral, page 207. Moral gives the date as the 26th, but this would clash with the dates Moral gives for Robertson being in Europe in his book on "The Birds".
  484. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 207
  485. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 208
  486. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 208
  487. Hitchcock and the Making of Marnie (2013) by Tony Lee Moral, page 128
  488. Interview: Monitor (BBC, 05/Jul/1964)
  489. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 656
  490. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 653
  491. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 657-58 & 660
  492. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 658-61
  493. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 661
  494. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 661-62
  495. Wikipedia: Age & Scarpelli
  496. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 662
  497. Speech: Screen Producers Guild (07/Mar/1965)
  498. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 664
  499. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 662
  500. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 667
  501. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 668
  502. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 668
  503. Writing with Hitchcock (2001) by Steven DeRosa, page 5
  504. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 669
  505. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 674
  506. Late Night Line-Up (BBC2, 03/Aug/1966)
  507. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 676
  508. Wikipedia: George Blake
  509. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 676
  510. 510.0 510.1 Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 684
  511. YouTube: acceptance speech footage
  512. 512.0 512.1 512.2 512.3 512.4 512.5 512.6 Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, chapter 17
  513. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 687
  514. 514.0 514.1 Helsingin Sanomat (2007) - A Hitchcock thriller that never was
  515. Variety (1968) - Pictures: 'Short Night' for Hitch
  516. Interview: The Mike Douglas Show (KYW-TV, 30/Dec/1969)
  517. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, chapter 18.
  518. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  519. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 11
  520. 520.0 520.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 11-12
  521. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 21
  522. 522.0 522.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 19
  523. Variety (20/Jan/1971)
  524. 524.0 524.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 26
  525. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 22-23
  526. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 39-40
  527. 527.0 527.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 38
  528. 528.0 528.1 528.2 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 27
  529. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 40-41
  530. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 41
  531. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 42-43
  532. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 43
  533. 533.0 533.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 44
  534. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 51-53
  535. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 56
  536. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 59
  537. Carrier's Inn, est. 1637
  538. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 62
  539. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 63-64
  540. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 64-65
  541. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 65-66
  542. 542.0 542.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 97
  543. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 103
  544. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 104-6
  545. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 106
  546. 546.0 546.1 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 106-7
  547. 547.0 547.1 547.2 547.3 547.4 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 108
  548. Alfred Hitchcock's London: A Reference Guide to Locations (2009) by Gary Giblin, page 89
  549. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 112-3
  550. 550.0 550.1 550.2 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 113
  551. 551.0 551.1 551.2 Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 114
  552. The Times (29/May/1972) - Letters to the Editor: Hitchcock's "Frenzy"
  553. Columbia Daily Spectator (05/Jun/1972) - Columbia to Grant 6800 Degrees
  554. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, pages 114-5
  555. The Dick Cavett Show (ABC, 08/Jun/1972)
  556. Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy: The Last Masterpiece (2012) by Raymond Foery, page 116
  557. 557.0 557.1 Interview: Camera Three (CBS, 1972)
  558. Interview: Alfred Hitchcock at the AFI Seminar roundtable (18/Aug/1972)
  559. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 714
  560. 560.0 560.1 560.2 560.3 Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 717
  561. Tomorrow (NBC, 29/May/1973)
  562. 562.0 562.1 Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 721
  563. Film Comment (1974) - Hitchcock
  564. 564.0 564.1 Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 722
  565. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 722
  566. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 723
  567. The Encyclopedia of Alfred Hitchcock (2002) by Thomas M. Leitch, page 100
  568. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 725
  569. The Encyclopedia of Alfred Hitchcock (2002) by Thomas M. Leitch, page 100
  570. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 725-26
  571. Variety (1975) - Pictures: Found and Lost Actor
  572. 572.0 572.1 Sleeve notes from Family Plot (VCL 1110 1115, 2010)
  573. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 729
  574. The Encyclopedia of Alfred Hitchcock (2002) by Thomas M. Leitch, page 100
  575. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 729
  576. New York Times (01/Jul/1976)
  577. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  578. Boxoffice (1977) - Hitchcock Will Direct 'Short Night' for Univ
  579. Variety (1977) - Pictures: Hitchcock's Next Film
  580. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 731
  581. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 732
  582. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 733
  583. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 733
  584. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 733
  585. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 734
  586. American Film (1978) - AFI news
  587. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 735
  588. Radio listing in the New York Times (04/Jan/1979).
  589. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 743
  590. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, 739
  591. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pages 742-43
  592. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page 742
  593. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, pg 745
  594. Alfred Hitchcock: A Life in Darkness and Light (2003) by Patrick McGilligan, page744
  595. The hospital is now the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (Wikipedia)
  596. Boston Globe - "Where is John Williams Coming From?" (29/Jun/1980)
  597. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  598. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  599. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  600. Project Genome: BBC Radio Times Archive
  601. Inside Scoop SF: Ernie's Restaurant Saying Good-bye
  602. See the stamp design.
  603. See the stamp design.
  604. The Guardian (25/Aug/2013) - Gilbert Taylor obituary